Are We Failing To Prepare College Graduates? Is A Mentor Just A Crucial Today As a Degree?

Are We Failing To Prepare College Graduates? Is A Mentor Just A Crucial Today As a Degree?

October 15, 2019 0 By Stanley Isaacs


Hi, I’m Patti Alper, author of Teach To
Work. I’ve been a mentor for the last 18 years and I’m excited today to talk to
Dov Baron on his Leadership & Loyalty show. I will be speaking about
project-based mentoring and how we can bring schools and businesses together to
help close the skills gap in America. Stay tuned. Congratulations, you are tuned
in to Dov Baron’s Leadership and Loyalty show, the number one podcast for Fortune
500 executives and those who were dedicated to creating a quantum leap in
leadership. Your host Dov Baron is the founder of FullMontyLeadership.com.
He’s an executive mentor to leaders like you, a contributing writer for
Entrepreneur magazine, CEO World and he’s been featured on CNN Fox CBS and many
other notable sites. Dov Baron is an international business speaker who was
named by INC magazine as one of the top 100 leadership speakers to hire. Now over
to Dov Baron’s Leadership and Loyalty Tips For Executives funneling in full monty
interview series where today we’ll be taking in inside a look at do college
graduates have the necessary skills needed to enter into the workforce and
if they don’t can we as leaders do about it if you’re new listener a new viewer
thank you for joining us strap yourself in we’re about to go full monty your
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alright let’s strip it down and dive right in as a leader whether you are a
CEO someone in the c-suite later on fairly during any capacity
you’ve likely encountered a college graduate applying for a position that
they’re highly qualified for on paper but really not prepared for in the real
world so how do we effectively prepare the next generation for the jobs of
tomorrow well stay tuned because you’re about to find out our guest today is
penny Alper she is the president of Alper portfolio group a marketing and
consulting company she is also a board member of both Network both the network
for teaching entrepreneurship also known as NFTE
and u.s. 2020 the white house initiative to build mentorship in STEM careers
she’s a trustee of the Alper Family Foundation has been for last eighteen
years she has a unique approach to philanthropic giving an entrepreneurial
mentorship has been featured in The New York Times no less The Huffington Post
The Washington Post time and felon entropy magazine I screwed that word up
last time I said it to buddy alpha is the author of a brand new book teach to
work here it is teach to work how how a mentor and mentee
and a project can close the gap in the skill in skills in this close the skills
gap in America I really should do that again but I won’t are ya gonna I’ll do
it again the book is called teach to work how a mentor and mentee and a
project can close this skills gap in America ladies and gentlemen please
welcome it’s good to have you on we took a
little while for us to get into this but I’m glad we finally made it because I
know you’ve got a very important message to share but I’m gonna I’m gonna take it
off track for a moment and I’m gonna say you know you talked a lot about kids in
school and in university and and mentoring them but let me ask you this
what was something that you hate it or at least strongly disliked back when you
were in school that today you loved what was something that could be anything but
it just really didn’t like it but now you really just love it you know in all
the research for the book mm-hmm I I was introduced to a woman named dr. Carol
Dweck who wrote a book called mindset are you familiar with it uh she talks
about the fixed and the growth mindset and you can’t help but question your
yourself when you read her book like like what was it about myself
hello what was it about myself way back then that maybe want to learn and what
held me back know what what what is it that pushes you to try and I’d have to
say back then I was timid mm-hmm I don’t know why like what is the difference
when do you begin to develop that confidence and how does that push you
through I actually have some theories on that that I need mentorship Hulka helps
contribute sure all right and I also believe that today for me as
an adult versus what I had as a kid yes you get to own an idea and you make it
happen and it is experiential kind of like learning and theory is not
so interesting No so that would be that would
shift I would say cool is really willing to fight through something because it’s
your idea and you’re doing it right perfect
well we are we’re in a very different time I mean there are 78 million baby
boomers entering retirement age and it seems that this has left or is likely to
leave a massive skills gap so I’m gonna put it to you
are we ready I mean is is our society ready for this skills gap no I don’t
believe so in doing my research I will offer you this you know this a gentleman
named Tyler Cowen who wrote a book called the complacent class mmm-hmm and
he says America has lost its mojo in the 21st century
and I would attribute that to this what we’re calling a skills gap and there’s
lots of scenarios lots of narratives going around that contribute to the
meaning of the skills gap so let’s just look at a couple of those okay
what what is there are no more jobs they’re gone they are gone overseas
they’re gone to competition globalization they’re gone to automation
we hear that davus yeah second we hear that there are jobs but there are not
skilled workers mm-hmm I have many sort of research and reports
2015 report says 7 and 10 executives face shortages and workers with
inadequate skills the Manufacturers Association by 2025 says they’ll have 2
million jobs available that cannot be filled 3,000 business executives come
together every year for the GE global innovation barometer one of their
biggest concern and here we go the misalignment between
education and business needs so that leads us to the third problem is edge
education educators potentially not conversing not preparing youth for what
are the jobs of the future and that’s a tall order but I think it
begins I just written a series of three articles for an organization called
education reimagined and it really got me into the weeds of this exact question
right like what what could we do to get educators to sort of open their doors
and look beyond their walls and ask businesspeople what is it you need to
help prepare kids so that college kid that you just described that somebody
hires it has a good resume but doesn’t know anything
what could educators be doing to help prepare youth mm-hmm I believe one step
is to listen to have interviews and dialogue with their neighboring
businesses and talk about where is technology heading and what is teamwork
like today in many ways it seems like we we have kept these two worlds very
separate the world vacation and colleges and universities and and you come out
with a some form of degree and on the other side is the companies and
organizations who need you to come out of university with useful viable skills
and so it’s it’s interesting to me that education has sort of kept the corporate
or the even the employer separate from them when in many ways it seems to meet
based on and a lot of that’s what I liked about your book and when you
talked about is that the need to encourage the organizations the
companies the employers to be part of the educational system
I was a little bit more about that because I think uses a vital point
that’s been missed well I don’t have all the answers I have some of my own I’ll
give you sort of big picture and then sort of some nuts and bolts I’ve had the
great opportunity to attend I highly recommend this the Aspen ideas festival
and what while I was there this last summer I heard speak this was the most
moving speaker I heard a gentleman named Astro teller he is the head of
innovation for Google their division called moonshots mm-hmm moonshots X and
he described the culture there mm-hmm my articles he talks about creating a
culture of raging optimism and scathing paranoia and he has all kinds of
different backgrounds of people come together and he has three mandatory
requirements for ideas they there has to be that will not take on something
unless it is an absolutely huge problem global that there is a radical solution
and that there is a technological breakthrough it has to fit those three
criteria and and 99% of ideas fail mm-hmm but when they fail he celebrates
he celebrates failure because it means we didn’t go down a road we shouldn’t no
we didn’t waste our time and let’s learn from it mm-hmm so I just bring that up
because that’s a kind of dialogue in a
environment that educators could learn from right like having everybody take
ownership in a new idea and try that anything is worthy of trying there are
no bad ideas and that failure is great it’s like such an interesting different
sort of way to look at that’s again one of those great deposits between the two
because in the business world in all leadership books I’ve written about it
myself many times and every every great leadership person I know is written
about the importance and the power of failure and recognizing failure and
learning from failure and embracing failure and failing forward and all
those kinds of things but the educational system is exactly the
opposite failure is depressing it is it is potentially the end I mean kids
literally commit suicide because they failed their exams I mean so this is
what I’m trying to say is how do we get the educational system which is in many
ways antiquated in many ways made for a an industrial age that we are now beyond
how do we get them to literally embrace failure the way you’re talking about it
so in one of my articles I wrote these few questions I’m just gonna pose you’re
asking the same thing but it takes a little further so what can we do to
prepare students for tomorrow’s jobs whose responsibility is it to bridge
this skills gap what is the new culture of innovation and can corporations align
with educators for better job preparation and what with that
partnership look like so my experience my answer is the book that’s my
experience is 18 years and mind you I come
I don’t come from a mentoring background I actually was a construction
entrepreneur I had a company in the Washington market when I was one of the
first women in that field and we were the first to be automated and so I come
from a business background but as your intro said we formed a foundation and I
began to think about giving back meaningfully mm-hmm and how how do you
do that so I loved the idea and here’s where this whole concept was spawned I
got involved with a nonprofit which you mentioned called the network for
teaching entrepreneurship that teaches teachers how to teach business but I
built this company from nothing there were three of us I mean in three years
we had a hundred management level employees and you know grindstone blood
sweat and tears pitfalls successes like a roller coaster sure and I thought my
gosh maybe I have something to offer these kids outside of the teacher
wouldn’t they benefit from hearing from a real person to hear my Falls and my
errors and how I got through so I actually said I would like to put my
money where my mouth is I want to be a contributor but I want to step up and I
want to go into the classroom and that was in 2000 that was in the year 2000 so
what I did I actually created a role for myself that would not interrupt the
classroom that would add value to the kids they each had to write a business
plan but what I ended up doing with my co mentor I brought someone with me he’s
much smarter than I am by the way he’s a Harvard MBA
the venture capitalists he looks at the business plans day in and day out and I
have more of a marketing and presentation background so it was a nice
I’m sort of merit anyway we help these kids launch companies so
we would come in in September and see these shy little kids with beginning
Inklings of ideas and by June they had launched companies they had plans they
were they were making profits they had forecasts they had a marketing strategy
and they were taking products or services to market so how old were these
kids at the youngest age I think the youngest I work with was maybe 13 I know
you have some amazing stories from that of your quote I think you call them
ducklings tell us one of those stories of one of those kids because I told me
if you’re when we were not on there some of these kids and how they done from an
idea a concept all the way to market you know in a major major way tell us about
that I it’s so hard to pick one because you know I’m they’re all very dear to me
and by now I’m still doing it I probably worked with over 750 kids it’s a lot a
lot of kids 30 40 kids at a time I always liked my story of a young man
named Khalid because he came to class at 14 and he was moved in late in the year
was December so he was way behind and he’s extremely shy and a little
overweight and totally uninterested in business and so this is sort of a
message to your listeners as well I have no idea when I go into this class what
my experience will be like or what kind of a ripple effect
I could have on buddy but my reason for writing the book
is my god if I can do this anybody can do this but you go in with blind faith
you don’t know what your outcomes will be or your return on investment you go
because it’s the right thing or it’s a good thing and you have something to
offer so come to find out he was sitting in the back of the class and we were
going around the room asking all the kids their business ideas and he
wouldn’t stand up mm-hmm oh I I met him after class and said well
I didn’t hear your idea so we work with him on developing an idea and this was
it he likes cookies he ended up making what
he called New York delicious black and white honey baked cookie it was this
huge cookie can you see my hands I mean it was you know like a moon pie and he
made it with honey instead of sugar calculated it to be a hundred and six
calories ended up getting a commercial kitchen that he rented and by 16 years
old Khalid had sold 36,000 cookies it’s
amazing is amazing he has written me several letters along
the way most recently now he’s in college and
actually I have one here I keep it because it matters to me
sure here here is the latest letter I have many along and some are in the book
this is most recent it says I don’t think your book does you or mr. fill my
comment or justice the business success is merely one of the demands
of the impact you had on me and my future your mentoring has provided a lot
more than business training you have provided me with life skills and lessons
that never escape my mind and for that I will remain forever grateful I hope your
book inspires altruism in others and motivates them to lend young people a
hand not only does it provide young people with guidance they need but it
inspires them to return the favor to the next generation and created a much
needed never-ending cycle of friendship and support beautiful that must feel
pretty damn good that that’s amazing like if you talk about return on
investment there I don’t think there can be in a better one
no that’s pretty good pretty amazing and you know in the book you talk a lot
about the importance of the mentor mentee relationship so let’s look at
let’s look at it from both sides for a moment how can a potential mentee find
the right mentor and how can the right mentor find the right mentee because
oftentimes I think we’re put with people saying well why are you mental this
person or what would person let this person mentor you and sometimes it’s not
a match and sometimes it’s actually I think that those relationships can often
be destructive just as much as empowering how does how do we find the
right person for the right whether it’s being the mentor or the mentee you know
I I can’t really I can’t really answer you on that in the back of the book I
have created a whole glossary first based on your skill the big huge
difference in what the book describes is and we need to talk about this somewhere
in here is what I’m calling project-based mentoring mmm-hmm the
Entrepreneurship piece worked for me Patti because that’s my background
I I understand and believe strongly I mean I have a huge belief that kids do
not learn to create and write a plan and execute to a plan and they heat that as
an enormous learning curve but also if it’s project-based it will create a
natural dynamic in a mentor-mentee relationship it’s not as much social and
emotional learning as it is working to a task mm-hmm and the task is an
assignment by the teacher so that’s the formula for project-based mentoring and
in the back of the book it guides science technology ite journalism
culinary and to a nonprofit potentially that specializes in those arenas and/or
to go to a school of Community College High School and find a course that’s
project-based where you can integrate with a student based on the subject
matter first so finding the right actual student I work with all thirty you know
I work with a lot of students and I see them repeatedly I probably go fifteen
times a semester mmm so maybe thirty times a year but I rotate around or I
talk to the whole group yeah so so those are the details you have to be a little
resourceful with I’m not certain how to do it in Reverse that’s not my sort of
experience is working your way upward but I read about it it is something in
the mentor organization they talk about reverse mentoring this is the thing with
the cultural change and generational changes that you know in my generation
there was only one way to men that was mentored down so I’m in the
position of authority you’re coming up I’m going to mentor you what we now know
with Millennials and what is already beginning with Gen Z is the need to
mentor up down and sideways so peer mentoring but mentoring the people you
are actually leading and actually having them mentor you in their areas and and
what I love about that is this concept that we guess we may have our area of
expertise and and even experience but the person we’re mentoring probably has
something to offer us too and equalizing that that that mentorship or I’m from
from cross mentoring I think it’s a very powerful way and I think it’s one of the
problems with with many people have been in mentoring roles is that it becomes
dictatorial and I know better than you so you’ve got to do as I say and and
then we’re back in the same problem again we’ve stayed that same cycle of
the supreme authority telling you what to do so I’d like to respond with two
things the first is this concept of project-based mentoring which is I’ve
spent a whole chapter on it I think that that can work in an internship in an
apprenticeship and in a mentor relationship I think the idea of putting
a project in the middle of that dynamic fosters better learning and I’m going to
share with you several sort of scenarios that characterize what I feel is a
productive mentoring relationship please do and I think this is unique to
mentoring before I begin them I wanted to say
that’s exactly what you just said so much of us in our adult dialogue come to
sharing who we are and how great we are you go to a cocktail party and you talk
about all your accomplished you know my my podcast and I am I radio
show and I have my books kids don’t relate to that kids relate to your
difficulty and your pain and they ask the most beautiful questions like
weren’t you scared of failure how did you know you could do that they’re very
simple questions so before I even tell you about the mental relationship the
first thing is is you gotta check your success at the door mm-hmm
and so I’m just gonna go through a couple of these by making yourself
accessible and vulnerable but you also represent success just by being there
you’re saying to your mentee if I did it through all these bumps in the road you
can too that gives them access to success you become available to them
they can envision sort of a place B that they might not have envisioned before
you – you – I’m here you can count on me and I’ll be back
so you’re demonstrating a sense of reliability and that you do what you say
and these are all just what you’re living in being but by doing these
things you’re giving messages the third thing is here’s how now you try mm-hmm
so you might say and if you’re conducting an interview yeah this is
something that’s worked for me you might try this and that’s the
beginning of skills development fourth I would say you know you’re playing the
devil’s advocate you’re giving back you know honest dialog and probing questions
but sometimes for a kid that’s the first kind of an adult dynamic that has been
respectful mm-hmm and honest and they can respond and
disagree so it’s a new form of a relationship the the last one I will say
is this I never open a dialogue with a student my first introduction to them or
with a mentee without saying this look I’m not your judge I’m not grading you
I’m not your boss a nitrile teacher and I’m not your parent I am what you would
call a consultant to you around your ideas this is big mm-hmm and I’m gonna
make suggestions to you but you can reject them this is your project this is
your baby we can discuss strategies but ultimately it’s up to you so I believe
that begins to teach leadership collaboration ownership it’s giving over
authority so I think all of those subliminal messages by your behavior teach ownership and leadership I mean
ultimately integrity is the behavior not the words and I think that I think as I
said I think there’s two you know what I liked about your book reading about what
you’re talking about is that this is not mentorship in the
way that it was that’s what I like about it in that it’s not lofty it’s not on a
mountaintop it is you know boots on the ground sleeves rolled up together but
I’m not in charge as the mentor I’m not in charge
I’m simply there to guide and you are free to dismiss that you know hey and
there may even be some friction in that but it’s okay because it’s your project
and you’ve got to decide and and as the mentor you have to decide
am i okay with this does this work for me too but that mutual space there is I
think he’s a very different way of looking at mentorship now you mentioned
something in there that I I know it’s not entirely on subject but you talked
about internships and the internships I think that to me I’ve said this many
times actually from the platform that I think that if somebody asks me today do
you think I should go to university Maya I’ve been asked and my answer is I don’t
believe you should it’s my opinion I think that you if you have a if there is
a company out there doing what it is you want to do I think you’re better
spending that education money going and asking for an internship and keeping
yourself financially alive for that period of time so that you get the kind
of experience where I’m not talking like you run around making cups of coffee all
day long but where you will actually get mentored what are your thoughts on that it depends if the company is receptive
and in in an education mode and I can tell you there’s a lot of education talk
right now about commingling about diversifying education to be more
experiential to include internships as part of an education experience so that
so that as I mean I can tell you get a gal up who wrote my for word did a huge
largest representative study of its kind called great jobs great laws and they
discovered they interviewed a million people educators administrators students
graduates companies students are twice as likely to have successful work lives
if they have the one-on-one attention of an adult be there being a mentor or a
professor and if they apply their learning to a
long-term project or an internship that basic dress that right both they suggest
both yes so so then if you’re a company and you have an intern the question is
how do you do that I’ve just written another paper on sort of four or five
different scenarios of companies working with educators that’s sort of a new
model mmm like Accenture this is so cool they take on for two months maybe 40
kids and they invite them to come be consultants with their consultants like
one example was they went to the District of Columbia Public Schools DCPS
District of Columbia Public Schools and one of their problems for the school was
how do we get numbers of people that want to attend next year we’re not
capturing that data well enough so they tell their client and they’re bringing
interns with them mm-hmm so the interns are part of the questioning the
gathering of the data the collaboration back at the office of understanding what
kinds of ideas we could come up with to help the school to help help prepare the
presentation back to the client so they’re seeing the whole cycle and
they’re part of it now that’s not their project but a very interesting formula
of internship it’s amazing ah and the kids I happen to attend the final sort
of internship end where the kids stood up and talked about what they took away
yeah oh my god it blew me away one of the kids said you know the
difference between school and work at school all you do is get a grade at work
you worry about making people happy he says I’d much prefer the latter
that’s interesting no I know that from from from the stuff in the book that big
companies like that’s in young like Accenture you just mentioned MasterCard
I’ve taken on what you’re putting forward how how are these big
organizations leading the way and what is it that smaller companies can take
from them because you know it’s I would suggest that it seems in many ways
depending on your point of view it could seem like being a big company like a Y
or Accenture Oster god there’s a big risk to take this on and it could seem
on the other way well it’s no big risk for them because they’re so begging and
for us as a smaller company who are in the five million 10 million 100 million
we’re a risk for us how are these big companies leading the way and what can
smaller companies learn from them the biggest surprise to me in doing the book
is the research of interviewing these companies and I continue to try to do
this in my blogs it blows my mind the takeaways for them in doing this good
work okay so I can give you reasons why first and then at a modified version
smaller companies can pull from this what they choose so here’s just a few
examples first of all the pipeline just like we opened with the skills gap nice
people like Accenture they cannot find the employees they want so they’re
willing it’s worth it to them to invest in building name recognition and skills
because that’s building their pipeline that’s the first that’s the number one
reason many of these consulting finance science IT companies do
to Millennials they really don’t want to work for companies that aren’t doing
some good work absolutely they would rather if they had a choice and they
look you up on your website and see that one company is doing mentorship they’d
rather go there then go to a company that’s doing nothing I heard that from
Howard Schultz himself he was at the that ideas festival also Millennials
might not have that opportunity themselves so they become beholden to a
company for putting them in a classroom mmm
it enriches the culture because they come back and they feel like I have a
purpose my company cares about my community it
brings a sort of open heart back to the culture yes maybe HR people just written
another piece on this it teaches leadership skills when you sit with a
kid first of all they’re looking up to you you have to learn patience you have
to learn humility if to learn how to talk at a simple level you you want to
live up to what these kids are expecting of you and it’s different with a younger
generation you become a more of a leader in practice you have to learn how to
speak and speak on your feet and if you’re shy and reticent you know it’s a
trial time to begin to do that so a lot of companies use that for training it
helps magnificently Ernst and Young said this with employee relations you can
send in a CEO or a vice president the mid-level manager and they’re going
into an inner-city school or a community college I tell you they leave that
classroom they have a whole new relationship it brings them together in
a new in a new way and lastly I’ll just say this it creates a loyalty people
that work in a company that does this want to stay they don’t want to leave
I’ll tell you one other quick little story this is kind of a blew my mind I a
fellow that built up the entire volunteer program for Pfizer he took it
from maybe 9 million a year to 100 million a year you know built it built
it for about 10 years and this was his story Pfizer was in two main locations
when it began Connecticut and England and it was a faceless company yeah
people were not happy when they moved into town and some of the scientists
volunteer of their own volition this started of their own volition in the 40s
going into science classrooms in the towns and helping kids by hook or by
crook and this is like good PR it ended up growing but the same families that go
to school go to the doctor’s office that buys drugs goes to the pharmacy then
buys drugs so in a roundabout circuitous way it actually helped sales because no
longer was it a faceless company I’m sorry I’m long waited I’ve done so much
research but smaller companies can do it at a smaller scale right I brought in
companies to measure with me I usually bring them in first with me to talk to a
class to share their experience to meet with a student one-on-one with
me and then they might begin by carrying up with one another prophet who’s in a
school and putting one or two people together to do that then it might grow
there’s lots of room for creativity how it can be deployed and how it’s sort of
beneficial for both sides but it’s good to stick your toe in and begin at least
make a stop so as I said there’s an old framework of mentorship there’s an old
framework of being mentored what would you say is you know from your research
what is then the biggest mistake people make in mentoring what is the thing that
you constantly see like I wish they would not do that that is not mentoring
I think it’s not about you it’s not about sharing everything you know about
you you you and your greatness i I that’s the biggest thing I have to
say is check yourself at the door this is about listening this is about coming
to a place where your mentee is not where you are that’s very good that’s a
great distinction that I think we all need to remember is I mean ok you it’s
easy to get it’s not about me it’s about them but it’s it’s a whole other level
to get that it’s not about me trying to get them up to my level but rather me
going to their level first and I think that’s a powerful and important
distinction so let’s flip it what do you think is the biggest mistake mentees
make when working with a mentor or looking for a mentor I think they have
to know that this time is valued and it should be appreciated in the model
that I developed I required a letter of appreciation
it was required like I feel bad for all the teachers that don’t get letters for
how much effort and time they put in I required this is part of closure and the
letters tell me so much what the kids are receiving so I think the
appreciation is really important and I don’t I don’t know how you teach that
except by suggesting they stop and think and pause but I I mean I will tell you I
have a letter from one kid just like blew my mind and I didn’t even know she
was like in the back of the class she said she had two things she took away
she said I can’t believe you came to our class where we are african-american and
looked down upon and expected to fail thank you for not looking at us that way
well she said thank you for teaching me a whole new set of skills in business
that I was completely unaware of before and she said I have a whole new view of
the world and the kindness of strangers now that is that was pretty powerful
that’s let’s go to warm your heart and lift your spirits it does so I mean I
don’t know she happened to have been were articulate in her letter but that
she could open up to the fact that I don’t look like her but it still being
appreciative and have a whole other view of that other world is is a big thing
and that she might have changed her self narrative mm-hmm this she no longer view
as expected to fail a bigger thing that’s that’s very powerful one of the
questions I like to ask is you know and it’s very apropos here in the context of
mentorship is not none of us are there we’ve all there’s a process and work
nobody’s ever done what was something that you used to do that you probably
thought was good that you now know was detrimental and you had to change it and
what changed it so what was it you used to do that you probably did with all
good intention that you’re discovered was not good maybe even destructive and
that you had to change it you mean when I’m entering or just in everything
across the board wherever it shows up for you well well certainly what I’ve
learned in a classroom is the lecture environment is out the more you can be
integrating and involving and experiential it’s great fun to be
innovative and to come up with things that will get kids excited and get let
them experience what you’re saying as opposed to just telling them kind of a
really interesting shift for me is to learn how to create an experience as
opposed to just talking about an experience that would be a big shift I
guess who is a leader you had Maya who’s a leader you look up to and say this
leaders doing it right this leader is doing it right well I was blown away by
that Astro teller mm-hmm I would blown away by him
because he creates this dynamic that everybody is engaged and everybody
counts and no idea is bad and I love that that I that I feel has to be more
ever-present so he really and he’s available on TED Talks actually tell her
look him up hey I heard he blew me away I know here’s another one I’m sorry I
just took a three day class on Leonardo DaVinci he’s not a leader
he’s a thought leader why I think it was a leader in many many ways Oh
oh my god I he the biggest thing about him is he’s a leader in curiosity mm-hmm
I’ve gotten to know Walter Isaacson and I attended this class that he was part
of in the head he had experts from all over the world on Sciences and arts and
sort of building dynamics many kinds of disciplines were present and the idea
that he was the very first man to cut open a body a cadaver and see how
muscles are built and designed that inform his art or how light reflects out
of your eye and comes out or and how that affects lighting and I mean it just
blew my mind so those were my two latest very cool so as we finish up here I want
to ask you this question what is what is the most practical thing that you hope a
leader watching us listening to us will take away from what you shared today
what is the thing you want them to say I’m going to put this in action today I
would hope that they might go talk to an educational institution
near there where they’re geographically located mm-hmm
maybe begin a dialogue of what their needs are like be self-aware of where
you’re heading in the next 10 years where’s technology heading and what are
the characteristics you look for in job applicants I so said that the New York
Times has taken away the corner office article I always read that that piece
every Sunday on how CEOs hire mm-hmm and everybody has their specialties of
things they look at so be aware of what your needs are in the characteristics
and communicate it and hopefully we can begin a dialogue you know I’m actually
talking at the governor level the Secretary of Labor Secretary of
Education Workforce Development this is much bigger than just a company to a
school this is community-wide it’s sort of the
sustainability of generations to keep filling our pipeline and Keep America
competitive very interesting I think would be a powerful thing to set up
something that would be some version of a town hall between education and
corporations because the the Miss connect the disconnect between the two
of them is going to massively impact this business here is already and will
continue to and the and education in the form that it’s in is is a dinosaur that
is completely outdated until we make that shift and places like become an
institute of showing that very very well it’s time for change I want to really
thank you for joining us Patti thank you for all that you shared with us it’s
been great please tell how it was and our listeners where they can find out
more about you and all of your resources great I have a website wwth to work
ei chto wo RK that curse is the title of Patty’s book teach to work there’s lots
of information in there I’ll just share this kind of opens with y mentor with
some history of case studies on five companies individual mentors and then
kind of what’s in it for the student it rolls into a sort of in-depth look at
what is project-based mentoring and then really the book is written to maybe a
reticent mentor on really how to begin and best practices there’s a lot the
last piece I mentioned is okay now you know how to do it let’s wait where where
you gonna do it so it’s why how and where so I’m hoping it will light a fire
and let’s don’t maybe you and I should host this Town Hall yeah wonderful well
thank you again patty it’s been great having you here your stay with us to the
end and we want to say thank you to you and we also want to say thank you to our
dear listeners and viewers thank you for joining us on the show today and I hope
that you do take what you’ve learned today and maybe get out there a mentor a
little bit or at least consider opening up yourself and maybe even your
organization to do so and remember the research consistently shows that one of
the biggest challenges facing even the most successful companies is somewhat
counterintuitive and that these fast-growing companies often hit the
point where they realize they’re spending an absolute fortune in
attracting training and developing talent and then having them leave them I
mean just an alarming rate so if you’re sick of investing and training and
developing your talent only have them leave you before you get your ROI and
reach out to us at full monty leadership calm where we provide the essential
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next time this is Dov Baron a Full Monty leadership calm saying stay curious my
friend stay curious about how you can mental the next level of talent coming
your way next time Baron