All 20 Pixar Movies Ranked From Worst to Best!

All 20 Pixar Movies Ranked From Worst to Best!

August 25, 2019 100 By Stanley Isaacs


– With the release of Incredibles 2 we now have 20 Pixar movies and that means it time to stop and rank all 20 Pixar movies from
the worst to the best. Now before I get started
go ahead and tell me down below in the comment section how do you rank the Pixar movies? Which ones do you love,
which ones do you hate, and everything in the middle. Here’s the deal, we’re not
gonna agree on our list because Pixar has a made
a lot of awesome movies and it’s very difficult to pick a Top 10 when they’ve made over 10 great movies. So as we dive into all of
this let’s be respectful, let’s understand these
are hard lists to make and talk about our differences,
that’s the fun part we’re not gonna agree
and we can understand where are other people are coming from. With that said let’s get started. Coming in in last place
is gonna be Cars 2. For me this movie feels an awful lot like a direct-to-video spinoff except with a gigantic budget. The combined shift and
focus from Lightning McQueen to Mater as well as the genre shift to kind of this spy comedy,
makes the movie feel to me like they’re trying to
appeal to the lowest common denominator as well as their youngest audience possible. For that reason there’s
not really anything in this movie that I enjoy or respect besides the visuals and for that reason it comes in last place. At number 19 is Brave. Now this movie was an
interesting change of direction for Pixar that I don’t
think really paid off. It starts off feeling a little bit like a lesser Disney movie then
when the big plot twist happens in the movie it
started to feel to me like a bad Disney knockoff. The general setup and design for the movie had a lot of potential but I did not like the execution on this one. So those two bottom
movies are the only two Pixar movies that I would actually give a thumbs down to. The rest I think are good to excellent. Coming in at number 18
is The Good Dinosaur. Now I think this is a decent enough piece of family entertainment that
has some gorgeous visuals. The first time I saw this
movie I was just blown away by how good the water looks in this film. Now this movie had a
few of the same problems that Brave does in that it
feels a bit off-brand for Pixar from the way that it
looks, the animation style, the kind of pedigree of the story telling. I don’t think that the emotional beats hit quite right so the movie,
while being entertaining and being fun, rang a
little bit hollow for me where most Pixar movies
have a lot of depth and weight to them. Number 17 is, A Bug’s Life. For me this is probably
the least impactful or memorable Pixar film. Like I can appreciate
that it’s a modernization of Aesop’s Fables with bugs
as the lead characters in it but there’s no specific character for me that pops, that’s
memorable, and I don’t hear a lot of other people talking about it. While it’s not a movie I
have any big criticisms for I also don’t have any big praises for it ’cause I just don’t
think about it very often or ever want to rewatch it with my kids. At number 16 is Cars 3. In general this movie
is a pretty nice return to form for the Cars franchise. Probably sticks a little bit too close to the Rocky III, tal-a-d-y
good nights plot template that’s it’s following but
it works for this franchise. The big problem here is
that the third act twist is telegraphed so far out in advance, as soon as a specific
character is introduced you know exactly where this movie is going and the specific way
that this twist happens and the point at time that it happens is one of the most ridiculous things inside of any of the Pixar movies. The twist itself isn’t
stupid, it makes sense in light of the movie as a whole, but when it happens is
very poorly executed and that really pulled
me out of the movie. Number 15 is Monsters University. Now this is a pleasant enough film but it’s also probably the safest movie that Pixar has ever made. The formula is quite simple, take a set of very likable characters
with some great voice talent, match them up with a
tried-and-true story template, in the case here, Revenge of the Nerds, and you’ll get a very
watchable, very fun film and that’s what this is. Not every movie has to be a home run, this movies not a home run but it definitely gets on base. Coming in at number 14 is Finding Dory. For me this movie had all the fun and the charm of the original film while not necessarily feeling as fresh or heartfelt as that film. Probably touches on a few too many of the plot beats of the
original film all along the way. Where this movie really shined for me was when it focused on
Dory and her parents. Whether telling her back
story of kind of seeing where the story kind of concludes towards the third act of the movie, that’s where this movie really found its stride and kind of hit the right notes. Number 13 is Cars a breezy tale of a big city racer getting
stuck in an old-fashioned small town populated with a bunch of very pleasant characters. The theme’s here about
humility and American nostalgia are simple yet effective. I don’t think this movie necessarily hits the emotional depths of some of the movies that are higher up on
this list, but it hits enough right notes to make it a very rewatchable entry
into Pixar’s filmography. Number 12 is Ratatouille. A weird concept for a movie
about a rat being trained by a ghost who cooked
food while using a man he remote controls by pulling his hair is shockingly down to earth in it’s themes and relatability. Brad Bird finds a way to
take this strange story and actually connect it with
real relatable emotions, but not only that, it’s
filled with vibrant, high-energy sequences
and chases in a movie that’s about cooking and family legacy. Now while this is a movie
that I’m impressed by what Brad Bird was able to do with it at the same time it’s not a movie I put in all that often
or would choose to watch all that often. Coming in at number 11 is Coco. Possibly the most
light-hearted and fun movie about death that I’ve ever watched. It has some stunning rich
visuals throughout the movie some great songs throughout it. For me the movie was a
little bit predictable. I was able to guess better than normal where the plot was going and
who was gonna to turn out to be what as things were going along. But overall this movie
hits on a lot of notes. It’s very emotionally
resonant and it’s a movie that’s tough to not start crying as you get to the end of it. Bringing us into the top 10 is Up. The first 10 minutes of this movie is some of the best visual storytelling ever brought to the screen. It’s so emotionally resonant and concise that at times it can overshadow
the rest of the movie and that’s not at all
because the rest of the movie isn’t great, because it
is great, it’s just that that first 10 minutes is so efficient that it can make the rest of the movie feel less impressive because of it. Now I was definitely one of those people that said Up is all about
the first 10 minutes up until recently where my
kids really got into this movie so I’ve rewatched it many
times and grown to respect the movie as a whole as we watch a man who has a lot of regrets about life that leads him to go on
this wild-crazy adventure in the film. I’m not crazy about where exactly some of the main villain plot lines go but overall a movie just filled with
all sorts of emotion, charm in such a unique
cinematic experience for a family film that
kids and adults can enjoy. Number nine is Inside Out. For me when I first heard
about the concept of this movie I thought Pixar had lost their minds and then I saw the movie
and it kind of blew my mind as it started to explore our minds and how our emotions
work and in particular kind of visualizing the process of what puberty kind of is like
in the deconstruction of the simplicity of
childhood and the far more complex nature of adult
thought and adult emotions. I just loved what they were
able to do with this movie and all along the way you’ve
got a great voice cast all sorts of fun adventures
to go along the way. And while this isn’t a
movie I put in all the time it is a movie that just wows me with what they were able
to do with the storytelling and ideas that they
jampacked into this film. Coming in at number eight is WALL-E. This movie contains
another stellar example of visual storytelling
in that the first half of this movie has virtually no dialog and you can fully
understand what’s going on, what these robots are
feeling and actually care about this little romance
kind of going on in the film. From there it kind of
does this gigantic twist and change in direction for the story and as they head up into
space the movie finds new ways to kind of be
emotionally resonant as we see where humans are
at and what they’re state is like and add new conflict,
new interesting dimensions into all of it. This to me is just such
a fascinating movie to exist because on paper this is not a good kids movie yet
somehow their storytelling is so good and their way of
being able to find the tension, find the way to connect with
us in the smallest of details even with a robot or a little plant, that’s what makes Pixar
special and you see that with this movie. Coming in at number seven is Toy Story 2. Now this movie is a great
followup to the original film that finds a way to continue
exploring these ideas of childhood nostalgia,
especially the section on Jessie’s backstory that once again is a phenomenal example
of visual storytelling that finds the ways to
pull at your heart strings while telling the story about a toy getting left behind but we start thinking about our own toys that we’ve left behind, that we’ve lost, that
we’ve forgotten about, that we’ve moved beyond and that’s powerful storytelling. Throw into the mix a great
villain in Stinky Pete the prospector the
character that doesn’t want to be played with, he
wants to go off and be a part of this collection and it just ties the themes together really nicely in a way that you really don’t expect from a movie like this. This is the part in time where
this list gets really hard ’cause these are all amazing movies and it’s painful to have
this one at number seven and not higher up. Number six is Monsters, Inc. The movie that probably
has some of the best onscreen chemistry between the characters where you’ve got two monsters and a baby, Mike, Sulley and Boo and
they are just so much fun to see them go on their adventures but what this movie does
once again really nicely is find a way to explore some ideas and have some themes that you can actually learn something from about how it’s better to focus on the positive
rather than the fear and the negative. All of it ties together to just make for a movie that has some of these moments where you realize the negativity of monsters scaring children while being heartfelt in the next
moment and all along the way you are laughing and having a good time. At number five is Toy Story 3. If Toy Story 2 is a great
sequel to the original one this is an even better closeout
of that original trilogy that continues to explore
these ideas of childhood and nostalgia while adding to
it this layer of growing up and finding new uses for things. And that kind of leads into the themes, the conflict throughout this movie as they go to this daycare as it leads into the climax of the movie
where you start to think, are they actually going to kill
off all of these characters, are they about to be incinerated. And as you step back in the movie you know they would never do that but
the movie’s crafted so well that as you’re watching it
you get a little bit terrified and you start to cry a little bit as you think that Buzz and
Woody might actually die inside of this movie but it finds a way to just kind of land this trilogy so well and have such a wonderful sendoff that encapsules everything
that the three movies were about while saying
something new at the same time. This is a great third movie in a trilogy. Coming in at number
four is The Incredibles. Once again Brad Bird makes a movie that is just jampacked with energy, creativity, world building and just
creating an atmosphere that’s fun to be in. He went for kind of this
60’s spy, James Bond feel, for the movie while
telling a superhero story which makes the entire movie feel unique. It has a plot line about
a family that feels very relatable while
talking about superheros which is very exciting and Brad Bird is a master at crafting these sequences that are thrilling to
watch and captured in a way that just keep you at
the edge of your seat. And part of what makes this
movie so special for me is that it’s an original
story with original characters with an original world and it’s not only a great Pixar movie, it’s
a great superhero movie and it’s a great movie just period. Bringing us into the top
three is Incredibles 2. For me this movie takes everything I loved about the original film, all the fun, all the world building, an amazing score and adds to it a story
that I resonated with a little bit more than the original film. I found that Screen Slaver,
the way the character worked, the motivation behind what was going on to be a little bit more
compelling than Syndrome. I had a few issues with
Syndrome as a character in his motivation, that
particular trope for a villain, isn’t something I particularly care for and for that reason I
watched Incredibles 2 and it was like, this
is the movie I wanted the Incredibles to be,
it just nudges it out just a little bit by having that story that just hit all the right notes for me while having all of the packaging of the first film that I loved. So this movie makes it into my top three. Our runner-up is Toy Story,
the original Pixar film is still one of the best,
over 20 years later, and that’s because they came
up with this amazing set of characters that you just want to spend more time with and they package it with this world and this set of themes and this tone about childhood nostalgia that’s populated with
the toys of our childhood that just makes for an
adventure that you want to go on that hits you on
so many different levels even as you start to have
this insane neighbor kid that’s tearing up toys. You start to think about your
own toys in those moments as you see Woody being replaced
by the newer, cooler toy, you start to think about your own toys and how those sorts of moments happen and you start emoting
and having compassion for inanimate objects,
that’s great storytelling, that’s a movie that is working and this is the movie that started it all. So for me it is my number two pick. But coming in in first place
for me is Finding Nemo. I don’t know if it’s
because I watched this movie for the first time after
I already had a son but this movie just hit
me in all the right places as it’s a movie that’s
really about parenting. It’s about learning to let go and that’s really what
parenting is all about and that’s what this movie is
all about, a scared father. But he goes on a journey
where he has to learn to let go, that’s the true loving thing to do for his son. All along the way you have
these amazing characters like Dory that we meet that
are fun, their charming, their likable, all of
this makes for a movie that hit all the right notes for me, even the musical score
in some of these moments as there’s little
realizations in Dory’s head, it hits just right for me. So for me this is my
number one Pixar film. So there you have it. That’s my ranking of all 20 Pixar movies. How about you, how do you
rank the Pixar movies? Tell me down below in the comment section. Tell me which ones you
love, which ones you hate, and everything in-between, and remember, we’re gonna disagree. You’re not, you’re gonna think I’m crazy with some of my placements
and that’s the fun part. Tell me what you disagree with. Tell me which ones you love and why. That’s where we kind of get diversity, understand where other
people are coming from and we can have fun as movie fans that don’t have to agree about everything but we can talk about this set of movies that we all love. And if you’re new to my channel please consider clicking
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