A New Vision for Healthcare at Claremont Graduate University

A New Vision for Healthcare at Claremont Graduate University

January 22, 2020 0 By Stanley Isaacs


(“In Other Words” by Tiny Music) – I was looking for a summer internship and Uganda Village Project
was listed on Handshake. So I went on, applied
for it and got hired. Going out there to do health education to rural Ugandan’s, really brought back some of the aspects that
we’re learning here at CGU on health education and health promotion and really catering health
education and health needs to diverse cultures. – It was back in 2014
when I got a phone call from Dr. Linda Houston, who
is a Chief Cardiac Nurse at the Loma Linda SACHS Clinic. She gets a lot of heart failure
patients into her clinic. About 30 to 40% of those same patients were getting readmitted back
to the hospital within 30 days. And she also made a very
interesting comment she said, “Once they leave, I have
no view into their lives.” So, my students and I, we worked with them and we designed a remote
monitoring technology solution for them, and through the app, they would input their
symptoms, their conditions. We would give them motivational messages to alter behavior. In a six month trial, not
one was readmitted back. – We are currently working on a project, looking at caregivers of cancer patients. And specifically those who
are in continuous treatment. We felt this is an untapped need. These are caregivers taking care of people who are going to be on treatment
for the rest of their life. And nobody’s taking care
of the caregiver in this. – Research is a social effort. It requires people to
gather, to get together and think together about
the research questions, the problems, the policies, the solutions. – When we come together, we
are bringing certain unique viewpoints and perspectives
and that is necessary to solve the big health care
challenges going forward. – There is a necessary
convergence of all of these things around the medical side
and the policy side and the social side, all these areas of integrated
health and well-being that are all so important. – This project that Saida
and I are working on came from a conversation,
– Yeah, yeah. – Both new faculty at CGU looking to do something different, and we just started chatting. – We sit down, we think together, we put together these research designs and we go over the literature,
we have these conversations. And in that sense, it makes me feel passion about what I do, but it makes me feel so humble. – I know my capabilities and
kind of, the tools that I have but I don’t know what a
health scientist might have. – And vice versa (laughing)
– Exactly. If we don’t have those
opportunities to talk we wouldn’t be able to figure out how to resolve these complex issues. – We have an opportunity to purchase the Huntley Bookstore, so
it was a very simple idea, simple solution. How can we bring the School
of Community and Global Health to our home campus and bring
our faculty and students where they belong? So now the simple idea has
really become a strategic one. – What a great opportunity that would be to move our School of
Community Health on campus as the anchor tenant in that building and theme it in a transdisciplinary way around health and well-being research and great graduate programs. – There’s no way that one researcher or one area of research
even, can meet the needs on health education and health promotion. – We are entering a tremendous
era of health innovation. We are working with genomics data, we are working with proteomics data, we are pushing the boundaries
with medical devices. – We all want a center like this. We all want to put the
problem at the center and work together to fix it, but nobody has had the
resources yet to do so. – A nimble university like ours, entrepreneurial and
transdisciplinary in it’s very nature that’s in our DNA, that’s
why I think we’re actually perfectly suited, for this
integrated health and well-being revolution that’s going on.