A Day in the Life: NYU Student

A Day in the Life: NYU Student

October 14, 2019 37 By Stanley Isaacs


(smooth techno-pop music) (smooth techno-pop music) – Hey guys, what’s up? I’m Matthew Friend. I’m a junior here at
NYU, I’m from Chicago, I go to the NYU Gallatin
School of Individualized Study, and I’m studying political satire, comedy, acting, and the entertainment business. Welcome to NYU. (smooth techno-pop music) (smooth techno-pop music) (moves into lively techno-pop music) – [Interviewer] So, where are we now? – Right now we’re in
Washington Square Park in downtown Manhattan, it is an incredibly vibrant area, kind of the center of NYU. – So what is it like going to school in the biggest city in the US? – Well, I think that it’s a very sort of adult experience
and I think it takes sort of a mature kind of
personality to go to school here because you are sort of put into a major city and you have to, you’re living in the city, you’re living in a dorm in the city or
an apartment or whatever. So it’s definitely kind of a
real-world, adult experience. – So the campus of NYU, does
it really have a campus? – It’s interesting to me
when people say that NYU has no campus because
I very much feel that there’s an extreme sense of vibrancy along the area that we’re in right
now, Washington Square Park. There’s Bobst Library over there, the Kimmel Center for
Student Life and then Tisch, Stern, Gallatin, all of these different schools are kind of within this very close area or
proximity to each other. So I kind of consider
Washington Square Park to be our quad, and it very much to me does feel like a campus– – Oh yeah, I mean, you’ve
got students walking around, you’ve got people studying here, so. Okay, so, I guess, what are
the biggest benefits of being in the city and what are kind
of some of the drawbacks? – You know, for me, I really
don’t see a lot of drawbacks other than, if you kind of
want that smaller kind of college experience where
everything is sort of, I don’t want to say isolated but kind of– – But you are not isolated here? – Don’t feel any sort of isolation at all, it’s really the opposite,
it’s extremely freeing. I just love, I’m a city kid, I grew up in the city of Chicago so I naturally love kind of living in the city
amongst a lot of people and different kinds of
people, and there’s just so much to do and I think
that’s the best part of NYU because you can literally never get bored. You’re in Manhattan,
you’re in the greatest city in the world, sorry to my Chicago friends. But yeah, just an incredible place. There’s definitely parties
on campus that you can go to, bars, if you’re of age, and yeah, there’s just
literally so much to do. Plays to see, Broadway,
there’s student shows, I was in a play last semester,
which we can talk about. So yeah, there’s no shortage
of things to do here. (lively techno-pop music) (lively techno-pop music) We’re here at the Kimmel
Center for Student Life, it’s a great place to hang
out, catch an incredible view of Washington Square Park. There’s also a lot of
auditions that take place for various comedy and performance groups, rehearsals can take place
here, you can eat here get coffee, whatever,
just a really great place to hang out and catch a good view. (smooth hip-hop music) (smooth hip-hop music) (smooth hip-hop music) (smooth hip-hop music) So this is my room, I
love having a single. It’s about a five, six
minute walk to class, really close to Washington
Square Park, too. So just pretty centrally located along the campus and very convenient for me. I have a kitchen as well, so I can make omelets in the morning
or whatever, smoothies. So yeah, everything’s really kind of great, great accommodations here. Like I mentioned, I do a lot of comedy and stand-up comedy throughout the city and here on campus and NYU, but one of the things that I do is I make
a lot of YouTube videos for my channel, MatturdayNightLive,
very creative, I know. And I do that here kind
of in my dorm room set up, my microphone, computer,
headphones, that’s pretty much it. This is Barack Obama and
I’m here making a YouTube video for The Crimson, it’s a great company, you should check it out. And here we are (chuckles). Okay. (smooth techno-pop music) (smooth techno-pop music) (smooth techno-pop music) Hey guys, what’s up? We’re outside of the Gallatin School of Individualized Study,
it’s a school where students who have kind
of two or three interests can combine them and develop
their own concentration, as opposed to one singular major. So it’s really great if you have kind of interests on varying ends of the spectrum, and you wanna just kind
of merge them together. It’s a really great place to learn. (smooth techno-pop music) – The Gallatin School, what is it? – I don’t know. No, I’m kidding. No, so basically it’s called the Gallatin School of Individualized Study. So really for students who
have two or three interests, they can kind of merge
them and create their own unique concentration as opposed to a traditional college major. – And this is unique to NYU? – Unique to NYU, yeah, there’s
really nothing like it. And there’s a lot of kind
of lingo and terminology that’s used, that I can kind of explain as we go on, but it’s very unique. – So what is your program
in the Gallatin School? – So with the help of my academic advisor, I’m creating a concentration
along the lines of political satire, comedy, acting and the entertainment business. So basically the way it
works is, you can choose from any number of courses
within the entire school. So if you want to take
a Stern business class or a music class, or an art
class, whatever you want. – And you just to have to
justify how it fits into– – Right. So basically, at the
beginning of each semester, students have to create a plan of study, and they basically have
to justify what they want to enroll in, which
classes they want to take and kind of write out
what they’re thinking. And by the end of sophomore year, students are required to write
what’s known as the IAPC, the Intellectual Autobiography
and Plan for Concentration, which is an essay that you work with kind of with your advisor, defining who are you, how you learn, why you learn, what you’re interested in learning about? How are you going to
historicize your concentration related to the different kind of requirements that Gallatin has? – Gotcha. So when you graduate, what is your degree gonna say? – Well, what Gallatin
culminates in, you will ultimately have a book list,
like about 20 to 25 books, of your readings and
texts that you’ve kind of acquired throughout your time here. And then you have to write a colloquium, or you have your senior colloquium, where you basically have a
conversation with faculty advisors and professors
on what you’ve studied for the past four years,
and it’s sort of like defending your thesis– – [Interviewer] Oh, that’s intense. – write a paper and really get into really just gotta know what
you have been studying. – Is Gallatin why you chose NYU? – Yeah, very much so. It’s just kind of the perfect place for me because I’m someone
who has their interests in kind of a similar
area, political science, comedy, performance, but there’s really nothing like this place to be able to not only
combine my interests in an academic setting but
then also make use of that, and go into the real world,
which is New York City, and kind of implement what I’m studying. (smooth hip-hop music) (smooth hip-hop music) – So you transferred from Tufts to NYU, what was that transition like? – You know, it was a really
easy transition for me. I found that coming to New York was just, there’s so much to do and so
much to immerse yourself in. I think that with NYU
particularly, you have to really be willing to
put yourself out there. Not stay in your dorm
room, you have to really meet people, be willing
to kind of go outside your comfort zone a
little bit and do things maybe that you’re not necessarily used to. And I think that for me, the
transition was pretty easy because I was willing
to meet people, kind of try different things at NYU
and put myself out there. – Was NYU what you expected
or have there been things that have sort of been unexpected, that have kind of surprised you? – Yeah, you know, I sort of expected the very adult-like experience that was gonna happen when I came to NYU, because I knew I was gonna
be living in a city now and no longer on a college
campus where everything is kind of isolated and you kind of see the same faces everyday,
even though I still do have that experience, but it’s pretty much what I expected, and even
better than I expected. I mean, I didn’t really realize how fun of a place this would be, there’s just so much to immerse myself in. I mean, the best part about NYU, for me, is that you can’t get bored. – So you’re in sort of an unusual program at NYU, and more broadly. So do you have any advice for students who are thinking about applying
to the Gallatin School or another program like it somewhere? – Yeah, I think if you’re
interested in Gallatin, it’s really great for a
specific kind of person who has really two or three
kind of clear interests and they want to not necessarily give up one of those interests, they
want to pursue them both and kind of mesh them together. And it’s really great for a person who has a clear view of what they want to do kind of professionally
and out in the world. And I think that what’s so great about Gallatin and NYU, but Gallatin
specifically, is that, someone mentioned, one person that I know, you really have a foot kind
of in the college experience, but you also have another
foot into the real world. – Oh okay, that makes a lot of sense. It’s very kind of career oriented, almost. – Career oriented but, I
mean, there’s incredible internship opportunities, incredible connections that NYU has to offer. What I love about about
this experience is that, like I said, one foot in the real world, one foot kind of in the
traditional college experience. I think it’s a great kind of balance to have at this kind of young age. – If you could go back and give one piece of advice to your high school
self, what would it be? – I would say, for me it would be kind of just start to pursue the
things that I really love to do, and not that I
feel like I have to do. I think I found that kind of
in my high school experience, I was doing some extracurricular
things that might look good for a college
application, or I was just kind of focused on resume building, and in hindsight I think
that you should just kind of just always
live your life based on, this is what I really
want to do, this is why, I’m doing this for a
reason, and I think that will ultimately reflect really well on, when you are applying to college. And also just kind of to step back during the process and be like, okay well what is it that I
want, what location do I want? Not where I feel like I’m supposed to be, just kind of reflect on what is it that I want and where should I be? (smooth hip-hop music) (smooth hip-hop music) (smooth hip-hop music) Like I said, there’s no shortage of things to do here at NYU and in New York City. You just kind of keep moving forward, like I’m gonna do to this cube. Okay, a little hard to move,
but if you enjoyed this video, please like, share, and subscribe. I’m Matthew Friend, with
The Crimson, signing off. (smooth techno-pop music) (smooth techno-pop music) (person grunting) – Oh, I’m pulling, I’m pulling. – [Matthew] We going? (person grunting) – [Interviewer] Go cube. – [Bystander] Keep going, keep going, don’t stop, don’t stop. (grunting and chuckling) – [Matthew] Oh my, God,
dude this is absurd. – Oh he’s doing great, he’s doing great.