9 Biggest Chilling Unsolved Mysteries From US Colleges

9 Biggest Chilling Unsolved Mysteries From US Colleges

August 26, 2019 12 By Stanley Isaacs


“Every thing will be fine.” – that something the parent say when their
kid leaving home to attend college. It can be an emotional and nerve-wracking
experience for their parents since it’s easy to assume the worst when your child goes
out on their own for the first time. Unfortunately, sometimes the worst actually
does happen. 9 Paula Jean Welden
Welden was a sophomore at Bennington College in Bennington, Vermont at the time of her
disappearance. She was last seen on December 1, 1946. She worked the breakfast and lunch shifts
at the dining hall, came back to her dormitory room in Dewey Hall and spoke to her roommate
for awhile before saying she was going for to go to take a study break and go for a hike. She didn’t say where she was headed. Welden left campus shortly after 2:30 p.m. Welden was hitchhiking near the Bennington
campus when a passing motorist picked her up at 2:45 p.m. She told him she was going to hike on the
Long Trail off Route 9, near Glastenbury Mountain. The driver dropped her off on Route 9, about
three miles from her destination. Several others saw her at that day walking
on the trail. The last confirmed sighting of Welden was
at 4:00 p.m., when she spoke to a man on the trail and asked her how far it extended. He told her it went all the way to Canada. Welden has never been heard from again. Her roommate became concerned the next morning
when she realized she’d never returned home the previous night. Later that morning, she notified the school
authorities of Welden’s disappearance. At the time, Bennington students were required
to sign themselves out if they planned to stay out past 11:00 p.m., then check in with
the school security officer upon their return. Welden had done neither of those things. When she failed to attend her classes the
following Monday, Bennington College officials notified her family and the police. An extensive search of the Long Trail and
its environs turned up no sign of Welden and no significant clues. The search was hampered by the fact that Vermont
had no state police at the time. Eventually, officials from Massachusetts,
Connecticut and New York stepped in to help. Investigators initially believed Welden had
gotten lost in the mountains and died of exposure, but as time passed without their finding any
sign of her they began to consider other theories. Although there were reports that she was somewhat
depressed at the time of her disappearance, her family and friends said she only had normal
problems for a girl her age and was not unhappy enough to commit suicide or run away from
home. She left all her belongings behind, and her
family stated she was not the type of person to leave without warning. There is no hard evidence of foul play in
Welden’s disappearance, but many people believe she was murdered and buried somewhere in near
the Long Trail. Welden lived with her parents and three younger
sisters in Stamford, Connecticut when she was not in school. She enjoyed painting in oils and watercolors,
pencil and charcoal sketching, and playing the guitar, and she was physically active
and an experienced hiker and camper. In part because of her father’s lobbying,
in July 1947 Vermont passed a law creating a state police force. Welden’s disappearance remains unsolved; there
has been no indication of her whereabouts since 1946. 8 Suzanne Jovin
Yale University was shaken when 21-year-old senior Suzanne Jovin was brutally murdered
on the evening of December 4, 1998. Sometime after 9:00 PM, Suzanne e-mailed a
friend from her apartment, saying she was going to leave some books in the lobby for
her the next morning after retrieving them from someone else. Afterwards, Suzanne left her apartment to
go to the Yale police communications center to return the keys for a car she had borrowed. Shortly before 10:00, she was found dead approximately
3 kilometers from campus. Her throat was slit and she had been stabbed
17 times. It is unknown if Suzanne had any contact with
the person borrowing her books and that person has never been identified. After returning the keys, it is likely that
Suzanne entered another vehicle at some point since it would have been impossible for her
to have walked to the murder scene during this time frame. Authorities immediately named Suzanne’s
thesis adviser, James Van de Velde, as the prime suspect. There were rumors he had been conducting an
affair with Suzanne, but there was no evidence to support this and nothing to tie him to
the crime. A witness claimed to have seen a white male
sprinting away from the scene on the night of the murder, but when asked to identify
Van de Velde, she claimed it wasn’t him. It was recently announced that James Van de
Velde is no longer a suspect, but the real killer of Suzanne Jovin remains unidentified. 7. Kristin Denise Smart
Smart was a freshman architecture major at California Polytechnic State University (Cal
Poly) in San Luis Obispo, California in 1996. She departed from an off-campus party and
headed for her dormitory at approximately 1:30 and 2:00 a.m. on May 25, 1996. When she left the gathering, she was having
trouble walking. Smart was accompanied by a female acquaintance
and another student from the university, Paul R. Flores, when she left the party. He was a food science major at Cal Poly in
1996. Smart apparently met Flores at the party earlier
in the evening. Her friend separated from Smart and Flores
at the intersection of Perimeter Road and Grand Avenue on the college campus. Flores allegedly told Smart’s friend that
he would see Smart to her home. She was last seen walking north on Grand Avenue
with Flores, towards Muir Hall, her dormitory. Smart has never been heard from again. She was not carrying any identification, cash
or personal belongings at the time she vanished. Flores was reportedly seen with a black eye
later in the day on May 25. When questioned about Smart’s whereabouts
by authorities, Flores claimed that he continued walking to his own dormitory and last saw
Smart on Grand Avenue shortly after her other friend departed. Flores told several different stories to law
enforcement regarding how he received his injury. Smart’s roommate contacted police later in
the morning of May 25, worried because Smart had not returned to her dormitory. The roommate had been at the room the night
Smart was last seen, and never saw her get back home. Her clothing, toiletries, cosmetics, medicine
and identification were left undisturbed in her room; there is no evidence that she made
it back there. Authorities refused to take the missing persons
report for four days, however, because Smart disappeared on Memorial Day weekend and college
students often take impromptu vacations at that time. Flores is the prime and only suspect in Smart’s
disappearance, but authorities do not have enough evidence at their disposal to charge
him in the case. The Smart family has persisted in their efforts
to get investigators to come up with evidence against Flores. In 2005, Flores’s mother and her boyfriend
sued Smart’s parents and Mahon, alleging harassment, severe emotional distress and lost income
as a result of their behavior. Smart’s case is open and unsolved. Her family held a memorial service for her
in May 2001, and again in June 2003. She was declared dead in May 2002. Smart’s family attempted to pursue a civil
suit against Flores for Smart’s wrongful death, but dropped the case in 1996 after Flores
pleaded his Fifth Amendment rights during the proceedings. Smart’s family has since revived the suit,
which has yet to go to trial. Smart is described as friendly and generous. She is a competitive swimmer and had traveled
to many places, including Hawaii and South America, prior to her disappearance. She had originally enrolled at the University
of California at Santa Barbara, but transferred to Cal Poly early in her freshman year. Her case remains unsolved. 6 Arlis Kay Perry
Arlis Kay Perry was a 19-year-old newlywed murdered inside Stanford Memorial Church,
within the grounds of Stanford University, California on October 12, 1974. To date, the case has not been solved. Arlis Perry grew up in Bismarck, North Dakota,
where she and Bruce D. Perry were high-school sweethearts. The pair married in August 1974, and Arlis
moved to Stanford University with her husband, who was a sophomore pre-med student. At the time of her murder, she’d been working
as a receptionist at a local law firm. The couple had been living at Quillen House
in Escondido. Around 11:30 p.m. the night of October 12,
1974, the Perrys had an argument about their car’s tire pressure. Arlis told her husband she wanted to pray
alone inside the church, and they parted. Bruce became concerned when his wife hadn’t
returned home by 3 a.m. He called the Stanford Police and reported
her missing. Officers from the Santa Clara County Sheriff’s
Office went to the church and reported all the outer doors were locked. Church security guard Steve Crawford and Stanford
Police officer found Arlis’s body around 5:45 a.m. October 13, in the church’s east transept,
near the altar. She was found face-up; an ice pick was sticking
out of the back of her head. There were also signs of strangulation. Police noted Perry was naked from the waist
down. A three-foot-long altar candle was in her
vagina, and another between her breasts. Investigators found semen on a kneeling pillow
near Perry’s body. They also found a palm print on a candle. Neither the semen nor the print matched Bruce
Perry or the security guard. The Santa Clara County Sheriff also ruled
out any links between the murder of Perry and three previous murders dating back to
February 1973. At least seven people were in the church during
the night of October 12 and the morning of October 13; among them were Arlis and Crawford. The other persons were identified; a seventh
was not. A passerby noted this young man was about
to enter the church around midnight. He had sandy-colored hair and wasn’t wearing
a watch; was of medium build; and stood about five-foot-ten. Bruce Perry was an initial suspect, but was
ruled out. The Santa Clara County Sheriff’s Department
says the case is open and active. To date, it remains unsolved. 5 Lynne Schulze
Schulze was last seen leaving her dormitory on the Middlebury College campus in Middlebury,
Vermont on December 10, 1971, the first day of final exams before Christmas break started. Schulze returned to campus and was seen in
her dormitory. She left her room at 12:55 p.m. She was on her way with her friends to take
a final exam in her English Drama class when she said she had forgotten her favorite pen
and was going to go back to get it. The exam was scheduled for 1:00 p.m.; she
never showed up. At 2:15 p.m., Schulze was seen standing on
Court Street, across the street from All the Good Things and the bus stop where she’d been
earlier. This is the last time anyone ever saw or heard
from her. She left her identification, checkbook and
all her personal belongings behind when she vanished. She may have been carrying $30 in cash with
her. Campus security was alerted to Schulze’s disappearance
two days after she was last seen, but her parents were not notified for a week. Schulze had mentioned the idea of faking her
own death and starting life anew prior to her disappearance, but her friends did not
take her seriously. In the letters she wrote frequently to family
and friends back home, she admitted she felt homesick and had considered withdrawing from
school, but she never indicated she was planning on dropping out of sight or leaving college
before the term was over, and she did register for spring semester classes. Both of Schulze’s parents died in the 1990s,
but her sister is still alive and hopes for a resolution in her disappearance. Her case is unsolved. Some agencies give the date of Schulze’s disappearance
as December 11, 1971. 4 Joshua Guimond
In the Snow at DawnJoshua Guimond was a 20-year-old junior at St. John’s University in Collegeville,
Minnesota. Sometime between 11:00 PM and midnight on
November 9, 2002, Joshua left a party at the Metten Court dormitory to go to the bathroom. Joshua’s friends assumed that he simply
decided to return to his apartment, but when they discovered he never went back there,
he was reported missing the next day. Joshua’s car, glasses and personal belongings
were left behind and he was under-dressed for the cold winter weather that night. It was theorized that Joshua might have been
intoxicated and accidentally stumbled into a body of water and drowned after leaving
the party. However, his body has never been found. Joshua’s disappearance happened to take
place during a two-week period when three other college students from the Minnesota
and Wisconsin areas – Christopher Jenkins, Michael Noll and Erika Marie Dalquist – mysteriously
disappeared after leaving late-night parties. The bodies of the other three students were
eventually found and while Dalquist’s murderer was caught and convicted, there is speculation
that the deaths of the two males might be connected to Joshua’s case since they each
have similar appearances. However, after more than 10 years, Joshua
Guimond still remains a missing person. 3 Jack Davis Jr.
Jack Davis Jr. was found dead in an exterior Indiana University of Pennsylvania stairwell
of unrevealed circumstances on Wednesday, October 21, 1987. He had last been seen the previous Friday
night, attending a party with his fraternity brothers. Authorities believed that Jack had died accidentally. They theorize that he went to the stairwell
to urinate. Due to his state of intoxication, he passed
out and vomited, inhaling the vomit in his lungs. The original pathologist also ruled the death
an accident, determining that he died early Saturday morning. However, his family was not convinced of the
official scenario. Two years later, a friend told them to contact
pathologist Dr. Cyril Wecht to help with the case. Dr. Wecht was puzzled by the fact that nobody
could see his body for the days that it had been in the stairwell. He also did not understand why Jack chose
to urinate in the certain place where he was found. He believes that Jack, in an inebriated state,
would have not gone to such great lengths to conceal himself while urinating. According to the original report, there was
no alcohol in his blood, even though he was supposedly drinking heavily on the night of
his death. Wecht also found another discrepancy: Jack
was clean-shaven on Friday night, but was found dead with heavy stubble on his face. The evidence seemed to suggest that he had
died later than Saturday morning. Wecht also found that the cause of death,
choking on regurgitated food, was impossible because food particles was not found in his
lungs. Also, Wecht found that the pathologist who
completed the autopsy had not opened his skull. Jack’s body was exhumed for another autopsy. Wecht found three areas of fracture in the
cranial vault of Jack’s skull. He determined that the fractures were the
cause of death, not choking on vomit. Wecht then visited the stairwell where Jack
was found. He did not believe that Jack had fallen or
been thrown to the death. He also believed that it was impossible for
somebody not to have seen Jack’s body lying in the stairwell because there were clear
views from the window. Also, Jack’s body and clothing were not wet,
despite the fact that it had been raining heavily in the days prior. Dr. Wecht believed that Jack died or was injured
elsewhere before being placed in the stairwell. Dr. Wecht’s findings convinced authorities
to re-open the case in October of 1990. However, little new evidence was uncovered
and the case was closed again, and authorities still believe that Jack’s death was accidental. Wecht hopes that new information will come
forward and that somebody from the college will bring this information to police. In spite of Dr. Wecht’s new findings, Jack’s
death remains unsolved. 2 Betsy Aardsma
One of the most baffling unsolved homicides in American history took place on November
28, 1969. A 22-year-old graduate student named Betsy
Aardsma was doing research in the stacks section of Pattee Library at Pennsylvania State University
when she was suddenly stabbed through the heart with a knife. Her body was found after an unidentified man
said “Somebody better help that girl” to the desk clerk before exiting the library. Because Betsy was wearing a red dress, blood
was difficult to spot, so no one even realized she had been stabbed. When they did realize it was murder, the unidentified
man was long gone before he could be pursued as a suspect. While no one else in the library saw anything,
some of them claimed to have heard screams. Betsy’s murder was completely puzzling since
she was not known to have any enemies. An assistant professor named Richard Haefner
is considered one possible suspect, as he reportedly dated Betsy for a short time before
her death and would face scandalous accusations of molesting young boys later on in his life. However, he died in 2002 and has never been
placed in the library at the time of the murder. For over forty years, authorities have pursued
thousands of leads, and it’s even rumored that Betsy Aardsma’s ghost haunts Pattee
Library. However, her killer and their motive are still
unknown. 1 Ronald Henry Tammen, Jr.
Tammen was last seen in old Fisher Hall, a former Victorian mental asylum converted to
a dormitory at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio on April 19, 1953. He was a resident hall advisor at Fisher Hall,
and lived in room 225. At 8:00 p.m., he requested new bedsheets because
someone had put a dead fish in his bed. Sometime around 8:30 p.m., Tammen apparently
heard something outside his room that disturbed him, and went out into the hallway to investigate. He never returned. His roommate came in at 10:00 p.m. and found
him gone. The roommate originally assumed Tammen was
spending the night at his Delta Tau Delta fraternity house, and did not report his disappearance
until the next day. There is no indication that Tammen left of
his own accord. His clothes, car keys, wallet, identification,
watch, high school class ring and other personal items were left behind in his dormitory room,
and he also left the lights on, the radio playing, and a psychology textbook lying open
on his desk. His gold 1938 Chevrolet sedan was not taken
from its place in the school parking lot, he left his bass fiddle in the back seat of
the car, and he left behind $200 in his bank account. Tammen is believed to have had no more than
$10 to $15 on his person the night he disappeared, and was not wearing a coat. However, authorities have not found any indication
of foul play in Tammen’s disappearance either. They do not believe he could have been forcibly
abducted, as he was large enough and strong enough to defend himself against most attackers. They theorize that he could have developed
amnesia and wandered away, but if that was the case he should have been found relatively
quickly. A woman living outside of Oxford, twelve miles
east of the Miami University campus, claims that a young man came to her door at 11:00
p.m. the evening Tammen disappeared and asked what town he was in. Then he asked directions to the bus stop,
which she gave him, and he left. However, the bus line had suspended its midnight
run, so he could not have gotten on a bus. The witness says the man she spoke to was
disheveled and dirty and appeared upset and confused. He was not wearing a coat or hat, although
it was a cold night and there was snow on the ground. He was apparently on foot, since the woman
did not see or hear a car. The man matched the physical description of
Tammen and was wearing similar clothes, but it has not been confirmed that they were the
same person, and Tammen’s brother stated he did not believe the man the witness saw was
Tammen. Tammen’s parents, who lived in the 21000 block
of Hillgrove Avenue in Maple Heights, Ohio in 1953, last saw him a week before he disappeared
and say he did not appear to be troubled by anything at the time. He was on the varsity wrestling team in college,
played in the school dance band, and was a business major and a good student. He dated at the time that he vanished but
did not have a steady girlfriend. In the decades after Tammen’s disappearance,
students at Miami University claimed his ghost haunted Fisher Hall. His parents are now deceased. Fisher Hall was torn down in 1978 and an extensive
search was conducted in the rubble for Tammen’s remains, but no evidence was located. His case still remains unsolved.