2019 State of the University Address: A Year of Celebration

2019 State of the University Address: A Year of Celebration

October 22, 2019 1 By Stanley Isaacs


So, it’s the State of the University and
every year I try to come up with some theme . . . that we can thread through the
presentation so that you can see from beginning to end . . . that we’re trying to talk about the same thing and this year, we decided it’s a year of celebration. So many things to celebrate this year. That we’ve accomplished and that we’re going to be experiencing this year. So, that’s the the theme of it and celebrations usually happen around anniversaries or birthdays . . . So, we have these four anniversaries; birthdays that are coming up this year. Harpur, Decker, School of Management and the Women’s Athletics Program. 50 years for women in athletics; 50 years for the School of Management; 50 years for the Decker School of Nursing; and 70 years . . . Where’s Elizabeth? 70 years for Harpur College, so . . . [Clapping] Happy Birthday! And, we always like to have an update on how many students we have as of yesterday:18,105. We count heads. 3,958 graduate students; on our way to getting some day 6,000 graduate students here. And we have some ideas of how we’re going to move in that direction. 14,000 and change undergraduates; that’s the goal. That’s were we want to stay. That’s the capacity, really – of this campus . . . is 14,000 students. And, you don’t want to grow bigger than what your capacity is. And, did you know that the first semester, as you are walking around, that one out of every third student is brand new? Well, we bring in about 5,000 new students; have 18,000 students. About one out of every three students is brand new. You don’t realize that, but I always tell people, say “hi”. This might be your new best friend. And, staff. The staff hiring every year brings hundreds of new staff on campus. So, I want to welcome all the new faculty and staff that are here, if you’ve never been to one of these before . . . It’s not too long, we’ll be done in 30 minutes. I promise. But, we had some really big things to celebrate this year. Unbelievable things. Where’s Kevin Boettcher? We won three rounds of Jeopardy. [Clapping] Kevin. I’m sorry to tell you, you are now on the second page. [Laughter] We won the Nobel Prize! [Clapping] I’ve threatened to carry this around with me until we win the next Nobel Prize. I’ve also told my wife, I’m not shaving until we win the next Nobel Prize, either. So, we’ve got a lot of work to do to get that next one. And, what a great man! He’s not here today. He’s a little busy these days. He’s actually giving a lecture over at the ITC to a group of local companies on the technology innovations that are happening at Binghamton University, in the Southern Tier. What a generous guy. He just won the Nobel Prize and he’s giving a lecture to a couple hundred local company members. But, you read some of the interviews that he talks about how Binghamton was this inviting place. A collegial place. There’s not fiefdoms. He left Exxon in 1988, knowing that he did not want to be a manager. And, that’s the trap that they had put him in. And, that he wanted to be a scientist. And, he chose Binghamton University because he saw something here that he didn’t see at a lot of other universities. So, I think his story, as we start to think about our accomplishments, his story and how he views Binghamton University has a lot to do with the success of the University. A look back at Harpur: One of our favorite pictures here of our Harpur students in 1950 carrying their chairs from classroom to classroom. They really did do that. I met somebody in Florida who did do that; carry his chair. I said “Why did you carry your chairs?” Because there weren’t enough chairs and you never knew if there was going to be enough chairs in the next classroom, so you just brought one in case. [Laughter] And, the dress. I love the ties too. Just a bunch of things that we pulled out of the timeline for Harpur. Started in 1950, as the Harpur College. After it had been Triple Cities for about four years under Syracuse University. It might have been closed, but New York State said, “No. Let’s keep it open and let’s give it a name and call it “Harpur College”. A really cool decision. That’s why we had 50 faculty on day one and 500 students on day one, because Triple Cities had been there. We moved to the Vestal Campus 10 years later. Graduate education began very quickly after that. We became SUNY at Binghamton and then later on, we became Binghamton University, at least our informal name. And, we’ve been moving around; expanding Harpur College significantly. But again, just a few highlights along that journey. 26 departments, 16 interdisciplinary programs and 22 masters and doctoral programs. The core of the University. The heart of the University. The most integral part of our success is because we keep that at the core. You don’t become a highly ranked public university just because you do what everybody else does. You focus on something that no one else does and do that excellently and you keep that core of liberal arts education, in not just the students of Harpur College, but the students in all of the colleges at Binghamton. School of Management:50 years. Just a kid. Some steps along the way there. School of Business in 1970-71. rankings up a little bit later about the
whole university but we always always do well in rankings when there’s a cost
part of it a value part of it and the School of Management definitely does
that but the one that doesn’t have cost effect on it is the number one provider
of new recruits for UI and PwC number one in the nation Binghamton University
all the schools it’s a great great accolade Decker School of Nursing 50
years 1969 first class 20 students it’s gotten a little bit bigger but not
tremendously bigger 650 students probably about 400 undergraduates and
250 graduate students and I’m sorry 200 240 master’s and doctoral students 650
undergraduate students the health and wellness programs were moved there in
2012 and the big news for them is they’re going to have a new home they’re
going to be moving to Johnson City into the Endicott Johnson shoebox Factory and
I wanted thank our Geography Department for all
the work that they’ve been doing to to map and to monitor and to record the
changes that are occurring at Johnson City it’s a story map if you google it
you’ll find it story map Binghamton University Johnson City and it has some
videos and some graphics of the things that have happened over the past four
years while we’ve been expanding our footprint in Johnson City but our
journey as a university started at the core kept the core there started added a
couple of professional schools CCPA evolved t lel evolved they grew out of
the programs that were established in the 1960s the engineering school in 1983
the School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical sciences in 2017 did I
say that stay in Winningham won the Nobel Prize yet you might see him a
couple of more times on these slides and then 2020 the Health Sciences campus
will be opening in Johnson City so we use this term the premier public we see
it in in our advertisements we see it in the rankings books they call us the
premier public of the Northeast but what does it mean and why are we talked about
like that I think it comes back to the things that stan has said in his
interviews it’s the collegiality it’s the camaraderie and that comes with
excellent people we have excellent faculty just a couple
that were promoted to the rank of distinguished professor this year in
Carew and chat distinguished professor and distinguished teaching professors we
have 60 56 Binghamton faculty who are at the ranks of distinguished professors
and that’s the highest rank that SUNY will will allow and will give but it’s
it’s not just they’re excellent in research or their excellence in teaching
or their excellence in service it’s how they collaborate it’s how they
work together the fact that we were able relatively easily
relatively smoothly to create the transdisciplinary areas of excellence
which in most campuses would have been fought we embraced it and we have done a
great job of adding faculty around those areas when appropriate
but it’s that quality faculty members and what attracts great faculty other
great faculty and a sense of collegiality and great students and so
it’s this cycle you get good students faculty want to be here as their
teachers you get good faculty students want to be here as their mentees and
just recently Jasper Bauer who is working on the drone locating of buried
landmines won a Goldwater scholarship award this year rankings we love
rankings when we do well and we tend to do well in all the rankings we moved up
one spot in US News and World Report both at the public level and at the all
university level so we’re number 31 in the top 50 public universities and
probably the only one in the top 50 that people can’t spell our name so did you
see did you see the Wall Street Journal’s article on Stan they spelled
Binghamton with a P killing me they corrected it so it’s been corrected but
you know how can you be ranked and people can’t even spell your name I
think that’s pretty cool actually but then some of the other ones and when
they start to put in factors of costs you know number 33 public and private
for colleges for your best colleges for your money from money magazine the top
10 best buy public colleges in the United States by Fisk the top performer
from social mobility as brank by US News and World Report 16th best public
college in the nation by business first number one in 16th best public
university in the United States I like business first there they’re very
generous with that and our first national championship we are number one
we are the top-ranked university in the country with regard to research related
to sustainability and that was designated by the Association for the
Advancement of sustainability in higher education a she which does that collects
all of our data all University data every year and looks at how green their
footprint is but then ranks them on different categories and we were ranked
number one in research now when you go to the website
you’ll notice that we were tied with four others for number one but they
listed them alphabetically and because we are Binghamton University not SUNY
Binghamton we were number one in that list so good change in name some really
cool things happen last year in our Faculty’s research Diane Miller
Somerville her her book on suicide tendencies for civil civil war veterans
and the research that she did to to try to discover evidence of PTSD in warriors
of the civil civil war almost won the Gilder layman prize the the prize that
goes to the best book each year related to the to the Lincoln era and our
Institute for Global sorry Institute for genocide mass atrocity prevention held
its second conference inter an international conference fourteen
fourteen countries represented over a hundred and fifty people at that
conference four continents represented and talking about some of the really
hard issues about genocide and mass atrocities that are occurring daily in
countries around the world and and it’s been widely supported by some of our
alumni with donations as well as an anonymous donor who’s contributed
significantly and generously to the creation of that the Human Rights
Institute was launched David’s a grinnellian ally Moore we launched the
Human Rights Institute a great program something that our students really want
to understand in more depth the Decker School two point eight million dollar
grant for a rural nurse practitioner training a big win for the Decker School
I don’t know if Mario’s here but Mari had been doing a great job advancing the
research activities of our of our faculty and Decker and related to
research our first year research immersion program has been growing I
don’t know how many were up to now Don how many students do we have in three
hundred plus students in the first year research immersion program and this year
we started the source project and the source project is students working in
the humanities under the guidance of faculty who are helping them do a first
year experience in research a unique opportunity a unique offering that a lot
of universities cannot afford to do we can’t afford to do it but we have
faculty who want to do it who are dedicated to it even Stan Winningham has
taught in this program some more research accolades this year we became
Carnegie r1 which is very high research classification when this came out I said
well is there is there a very very high research category no no there’s just one
very high top of the deck r1 it’s a combination of PhDs granted and research
expenditures it’s a great group of people to be in
about 120 universities in that list and we want to stay there it’s important to
stay there research expenditures tipped at topped at forty eight point six
million for the 1819 academic year and it’s continuing continuing to grow and
we anticipate it to cross 50 million this year I don’t know if Lewis pipers
here but Lewis won a National Science Foundation major research
instrumentation grant a 1.2 million dollar grant to purchase a one of its
kind piece of equipment so it’s a piece it’s a piece of equipment that analyzes
materials and tells you what’s inside of them basically and can be done at a
scale that can help us improve the technologies around guess what lithium
batteries because Lewis is one of the researchers in that group we started and
advanced a Center for heterogeneous integration research packaging this is a
partnership with a semiconductor Research Corporation sponsored by
companies and some other universities think Purdue is involved in that as well
we also won a center for advanced technologies from New York State this
year we now have two cats two centers for advanced technology this second one
being around flexible medical devices and being led by Mark Pollux are our
longest held national center the Derk Center the developmental exposure
alcohol Research Center was renewed got another five-year renewal and I got to
thank Linda Speer and Terry Terry deke for working on that proposal and
bringing that home and did I mention that Stan whittingham won the 2019 Nobel
Prize in Chemistry it sounds good but there was a bump in the road last
year and we learned a lot from that bump in the road we had certainly a fiscal
difficulty and that’s one of the reasons why we moved the time and the date of
this presentation to after we have all the official enrollment numbers in
Nazarene is he or she will verify that we have all the official Ruhlman numbers
in and we know how much revenue has been paid by those students because that was
the problem last year we knew how many students we had but the mix in state how
to state graduate undergraduate full-time part-time wasn’t what we had
expected and we missed by a long way and so we had to quickly quickly come up
with a plan in order to meet that and I thought if we can do this we can do
almost everything we were 13 million dollars short last year for payroll we
spent 8 million dollars of our reserves to cover that we also got a lot of help
from the New York State Legislature Thank You Donna
Thank You Fred and thank you Governor Cuomo for actually appropriating it at
the end I think it might have coming out of his side pocket but we got five
million dollars in terms of four back pay raised money from the state so it
reduced it from 13 million to 8 million that we had to spend out of reserves but
but when I sent out that memo last year we’re on a hiring hold I thought it was
13 at that time we didn’t learn that was going to only be 8 until late later in
the spring so as you’re doing that and you’re looking at this shortfall you say
okay we have to rethink how we’ve done business during the years of SUNY 2020
we were adding growing net faculty every year and then all of a sudden you have
to take a kind of a u-turn and and plan differently and have different processes
as you’re going in the other direction so we decided to have a hiring hold not
very popular but we had a hiring hold and said look if you need to hire
somebody to replace somebody who just left you need to get permission you
can’t just do it we need you to think hard should that position be be replaced
or should you think about reorganizing and a lot of schools colleges units
divisions did reorganizations of offices during that time period we delayed our
university initiatives the for university initiatives that came out of
the roadmap renewal we delayed them kind of put them on hold for for the
period of time we extended the use of interim positions specifically the five
ones that we had to stop the searches on the vice president for advancement the
chief diversity officer of the Dean of Watson the director of ELP and the the
Dean of Students so we held those as interim positions for a period of year
and we created incentives we needed some incentives so that the deans could be
empowered to say look we need to grow our graduate enrollment I now have an
incentive if you meet our target if we meet our target I won’t have to take a
cut this year if we beat our target I will actually get that money back 100%
of that money back that motivated the Dean significantly and they did a great
job they really worked hard with their departments and we are in much better
shape now we are not out of the woods we are in much better shape now and I
thought the best thing to do was two weeks ago
lift the hiring hold stop the review process let the deans and the vice
presidents manage their budgets budgets like they had in the past understanding
though that this could happen again very quickly and so we want to make sure that
you’re still using the same kind of fiscal responsibility and fiscal
oversight that you did during the one year that we had the hiring hold in
place so where are we now I think the budget challenges are manageable we also
got some help from the SUNY Board of Trustees by increasing the undergraduate
tuition by $200 the academic excellence fee by a hundred and fifty dollars and
so those increases helped us also meet our budget requirements but the big
number the big improvement was increasing our graduate enrollment
across almost the entire university in in all the different colleges and
schools and we did limit the use of reserve funds which was good and the big
story was and I don’t think our ease here is Hari in India again
probably but Hari Sri Hari the Dean of Watson probably spends more time in
India now with some of his faculty in some of his colleague Dean’s doing the
recruiting that is necessary the on ground recruiting that is necessary to
bring students from a very very intelligent group of students in India
to Binghamton University and and way exceeded our expectations this year
first from India that came here wonderful
young people who who love Binghamton University and add a tremendous amount
of cultural diversity to the campus as well so I got to give him a lot of
credit for the international recruiting initiatives we did last year as soon as
I said we restarted the hiring process and we are starting the searches for
those five leadership positions so I want to thank everybody here because you
did it we did it with hard work we did it with innovation and we did it with
creativity and we will go forward now with a little less austerity than we had
in the past and another reason to celebrate I think another big reason to
celebrate is in 1819 was our best year ever
significantly our best year ever in fundraising 19 point 1 million dollars
in gifts 14.2 million of them were in cash the other 5 million being in
pledges that will come in over multiple years some of the really unique
donations that we received this year 1.9 million dollars by Ellen Kashuk class of
65 to establish into an in debt and Dow the Institute for social justice for
women and girls and susan straley will be the founding director of that
institute a wonderful gift by Ellen and a wonderful person she came here for the
the launch of that program and she’s going to be a great partner was a
faculty member at San Jose State and studied this this field for entire
entire career professor John I shoe passed away just this last year left us
a million dollars for a grant to foster graduate chemical research beyond
expectations so supporting our graduate students in chemistry a fund that is
well used by the department chair and the department members there and Marilyn
link again sad to lose Maryland last year at the age of 92 but left us in her
will more than a million dollars and that million dollars she gave us the
ability to move where we thought it would be best used and as we’re building
this new building in Johnson City for the nursing school the second floor will
have a simulation center and that simulation center with the generous
extremely generous support of the Decker foundation will now also have an
endowment to help manage its operating expenses courtesy
of Maryland Linksys statement the last bullet is kind of interesting too in the
last two years thanks to our development officers who many of them are here today
we received 13 $1,000,000 or greater gifts in the last two years and five
years prior I’m sorry five total in Prior history
now that doesn’t say that we weren’t good in the past that just says that our
alumni are getting to the point where they can give away a million dollars and
that’s important to know we have a hundred and forty thousand alumni only
3500 of them have passed away and the rest of them are probably still in their
mid 40s and mid 50s so we are just capitalizing on the success of our
students and our alumni the great education that they had here and the
successes that they’re having we’ve got to keep them proud of us we have to make
sure that they they read good things about us maybe they actually have heard
that Stan Winningham won the Nobel Prize what’s new in Johnson City our mayor’s
here maybe he could tell us better than I can but a lot of things are happening
in Johnson City we welcome the third cohort of pharmacy students doctor of
pharmacy is a four-year program so the third cohort means there’s one more
cohort and then in 2021 we’ll have our first graduation of the students there
we we beat we exceeded our target for students in this cohort I think we had
91 or 92 with a target of 90 students in that third cohort class in between the
nursing building and the the pharmacy building there’s an empty lot grass
growing there we’re going to be building an RD building there again thanks to our
assembly woman and our senator 16 million dollar building will go there
specifically for research and development around pharmaceutical drug
discovery and investigations and it will have an entire floor that is shelled out
for industry partners and another floor that is dedicated to the faculty in the
pharmaceutical Sciences Department in the School of Pharmacy it’ll be a great
building very state-of-the-art building and then if you go down the street down
corylus you’ll run into the old a solid building that’s a yellow brick building
we’ve purchased that building it’s it’s not in bad shape it hasn’t
been used in a long time it was a factory it made it made paper for the
paper industry or for the photographic industry it’s a perfect place if
somebody wanted to create manufacturing facility there and the state has given
us 11 million dollars to attract an industry partner to do the renovations
for that building and hopefully actually perhaps manufacture a pharmaceutical
component that is designed and developed inside our School of Pharmacy that’s the
big dream that’s the big dream for private investments are occurring
Johnson City and Greg knows this as well you’ve got the sunrise century project
that’s right across the street from us you’ve got the Grand Avenue and Willow
Street project you’ve got a lot of interest around Lester Lester Avenue
properties and just over the border into Binghamton
so I look at Mayor David is the Emma Street project the Ann scope camera
Factory which has been completely renovated by an outstanding developer
from Syracuse and it’s occupied a lot of our students are living there now as
well you should draw if you drive by it you’ll you’ll be very impressed so by
the fall of 2025 we predict that we’ll have more than 1,900 students faculty
and staff working and learning in the Health Sciences Campus that’s the plan
that’s the goal and that probably will happen by 2025 I know I’ve made promises
about numbers in the past that haven’t always come true but this one I think we
have a lot of a belief that this will happen and imagine this compared to what
we did in downtown Binghamton where we put about 600 students in downtown
Binghamton CCPA and 20 Holly Street and the Twin Rivers
apartments grew out of there imagine what can happen in Johnson City with all
those students over there so I’ve been using the term School of Nursing well as
you add new programs occupational therapy physical therapy and and
speech-language pathology you need to actually create new schools you have to
create a School of Applied Health Sciences and School of Rehabilitation
Sciences and we also are going to be building a clinic in Johnson City when
you have all those schools you can’t have the schools be part of a school you
have to have the schools be part of a college so our decision to chain
change the name of the school to a college said well Decker’s been such a
great supporter of us over 10 million dollars has been given by the Decker
foundation over the lifetime of their foundation fund let’s just call it the
Decker College of Nursing and Health Sciences and Andry label it as that the
college for Decker and I I went to ask the board of directors of the Decker
foundation and they said thank you we’d love that and so it’s a great
partnership that we’ve had for many years with the Decker foundation one of
the big benefits of being in Johnson City with Health Sciences programs is
that you get to work in interprofessional teams will have Social
Work students they are pharmacy students nursing students Public Health students
and even upstate medical students most of you know or some of you might not
know that we have a partnership with UHS with our nursing program and our
pharmacy program Upstate Medical has a partnership with UHS for their MD
program and so those third and fourth-year MD students are down here
working in UHS doing their clinical rotations they’re here they live here
and they interact and they get trained in interprofessional education treat
teams with our pharmacy students and nursing students because the medical the
the Upstate medical students that would be interprofessional education
opportunities aren’t here so that’s a great opportunity another real big
reason why we decided to move as much as we could into Johnson City and we’re
doing a lot of good things I believe on the best of campus although it is a
little of a bit of a problem when you get eight major projects multi-million
dollar projects going on simultaneously the engineering building the exterior
cladding great improvement but it’s not just the look what’s inside that
building is being improved as well the exterior cladding allowed us to put new
windows and new insulation in we’re gonna save over a hundred thousand
dollars a year in energy in the engineering building just from that
exterior cladding and insulation the library renovations were in the
programming phase of the renovating the third floor of Bartow library 40,000
square feet filled with books and we know that students would rather sit in
there and study and work in teams then walk stacked so
redesigning that so it’ll be more accessible to student work spaces and
finding other locations for those books that are not as rapidly used science to
demolition and construction you’ve probably seen what’s going on with
science to completely gut it from the inside out a new skin is going to be put
on there as well just like the engineering building a little different
color again improving the energy efficiency of that building all of these
are provided from the SUNY construction fund mostly because we have a great team
of professionals here who serves up pre-designed projects to the SUNY
construction fund while all the other SUNY campuses are trying to figure out
how does how to spend their money that they’ve been given they can’t do it they
actually give us some of the money that can’t be spent at other campuses so we
have 50 million dollars that we’re going to be looking for for the Bartow library
project the engineering building more than 25 million dollars invested there
the Hindman dining hall Edition which is actually being paid by Sodexo a
multi-million dollar project Cleveland Hall part of Hinman a renovation project
there and then the University Union Basin renovations which will add more
flexible space open space for student use in the basement and there’s a good
website if you ever want to know more about these projects that gets updated
on a regular basis with construction news and also some dates of completion
of these different projects so as I mentioned we put our university
initiatives on hold but we are restarting them the health science
campus really wasn’t put on hold there was a construction project that just
kept going through that period of time the Health Sciences Corps facilities the
big idea in there was a brain and body imaging center that would require the
purchase of a very expensive MRI functional magnetic resonance imaging
machine we have a partnership that we’re building with UHS where they would
actually locate the MRI that we would be purchasing and we are hoping that the
regional economic development council will help us purchase that locate that
MRI inside the actual place where the the MRIs are done for patients but then
use it for research in the off hours a great partnership with
a chest and will cost us almost nothing other than providing the piece of
equipment the data science and the data science tae have kind of been merged
together and they’ve been working on developing secure computing labs we’ve
given them a million to two million dollars budget for capital Niazi beador
has been leading that group on the staff side and the faculty are participating
with him to come up with what what kind of space needs do we need what kind of
computational facilities we need the security of data especially in the
healthcare field is critical and how do you protect that data and that’s
probably going to be the major expenditure that will come out of that
initiative this year and they also have some seed grant money for research
projects and remember the data science initiative is to find areas of data
science where it’s not being used so it’s not just focused on those
traditional things we think about is when you google something and it comes
up so quickly using data science methods it’s looking at other things in the
education world perhaps and then our post doctoral diversity program that we
had started and we had brought in two cohorts of postdoctoral pre faculty
members who were embedded in different departments well then Along Came prodigy
and prodigy if there’s if you you go to our FAQ page you can learn more about it
the prodigy program was something that our Chancellor really wanted to get
started she wants to hire 1,000 underrepresented minority faculty over
the next 10 years across all of SUNY and we put in a proposal this past summer
and it’s been approved by SUNY which kind of gives us a hunting license to go
out and hire as many faculty as we can within these categories and if we are
successful they will pay almost all the first year salary half of the second
year salary and about a third of the third year salary so it’s a replacement
for the postdoctoral fellow program but I think it’s actually better because
it’s going to be hiring faculty right into tenure-track positions rather than
into postdoctoral positions which was our University initiative so what’s next
you’ve got to you got to have some things all those other things aren’t
done lots to do on those other slides but what’s next one of the things we’ve
talked about a lot in in the steering committee for the road map
is this Carnegie classifications carnival classifications for research
are one where we are there but there’s also a Carnegie classification for
community engagement so we put two and there’s about 300 universities in that
classification and we’re not and it just doesn’t make you feel good when you see
Stony Brook in something and we’re not but it’s also a good thing it shows that
we are engaged with our community not just that we go that way but they come
this way and and we’re putting together a team to figure out how can we do this
it’s it’s not an easy process but what we think it’s it’s worthwhile we had a
great camp we had a great year in fundraising 19 point 1 million dollars
we are going to start a campaign we’re kind of in the second year or third year
of a silent phase we’ll go public when we get about half way to our goal our
goal is flexible but right now we think in seven years we could raise 150
million dollars we’ve raised about 50 so far so if we can get to 75 million
dollars in the next six to twelve months which is a lot of money but if we can do
that extra 25 million dollars we will announce a campaign and go public the
goal is probably next fall and input so in the meantime it’s a secret right how
do you keep us campaign secret when you’re asking people for money it’s hard
it’s really hard the innovation I’m sorry a master plan for the fine arts
building where’s our fine arts people all right long overdue long overdue a
regular patron of many of the theaters in there
love them love the students but we know that they all need work we’re doing a
little bit of work with dance floors right now but we need a master plan for
the entire building we have some tremendous visual arts performing arts
theater dance cinema I’m missing some things but music see I knew I was
missing something that are that are just outstanding in
fine arts and then there’s some concepts perhaps that maybe we could create a
School of Fine Arts which I think would be an outstanding idea because I think
the departments are are working well together right now so maybe this would
give them some extra effort to move forward with more alumni relations but
they need a master plan they need a better building and so we’ll be spending
the next year putting together a plan we don’t the money yet
but if we get a good plan together and we bring that to SUNY the money will
flow and it will be a big project so I’m really looking forward to that the
Innovation Lab this has been something that we’ve been doing kind of in James’s
center for learning and teaching space but we really need a space this is a
program that opened our Dylan and James put together a couple of years ago small
groups of students about 25 in a class maybe 30 or 40 now there’s two cohorts
did we start a third cohort James not yet so we’re still in our second cohort
of students these are open-ended problem solving sessions where students are
proposed with problems and they start to think about how can I solve that problem
and it’s a four-year engagement with the or three-year engagement with these
students sophomore junior and senior year and they need a physical space and
we’re working in partnership with the library perhaps there’s some space in a
library that makes sense for that and as I mentioned we are launching ot
occupational therapy physical therapy and speech-language pathology programs
and two other projects that are just one one still in the drawing board a Welcome
Center you know as you drive in Bartle Drive or did you see the big sign that
says Stanley Whittingham won the Nobel Prize and then you go underneath that
sign and on the right there’s this little shack that’s sort of our Welcome
Center we need something that’s a little more sophisticated than that a little
more aesthetic than that so we have some ideas of how we could build a Welcome
Center maybe tucked around the corner there in that in that parking lot that
is almost always empty just so you know that lot is almost always empty if
you’re looking for parking but that would be a great addition I think if we
could find some funding for that and the living building the Living Building at
nuthatch Hollow I know there’s a lot of people in the audience we’ve actually
spent time up there with with shovels and and posthole diggers and moving
equipment and I see Carl right here because we’ve both been up there trying
to work as much as we possibly can before we start going to bid and
bringing in contractors to do some of the work for the living building it
nuthatch hollow which was a donation to us by the Schumann family who’ve been
generously supporting that work so far so things looking ahead things to do I
really think 1819 even with that bump in the road was successful
and I want to also say that the bump in the road made it even more successful
because we met a challenge we ran into a challenge almost overnight we ran into a
challenge a big challenge we put our minds to it we worked hard we all work
together like Stan says there’s no feaf thumbs here everybody has to work
together and we solve that problem remember we’re not completely out of the
woods but we’re pretty close to being out of the woods I think that is an
accomplishment in itself even though when it happened it was felt like a bad
thing but it really wasn’t it turned out to be a good thing because we saw that
challenge so what’s the future hold we don’t know but we do know that if it’s
going to have some challenges and opportunities we have to make the best
of them and we have to take them to our advantage so thank you there’s an FAQ
page now if you go to Binghamton dot edu slash FAQ there’s some questions that
have already been posed proposed there about prodigy about our budget so if you
go there and you want to ask a question just enter the question in it comes to
me and a couple people in my office and we will it write and answer those
questions and post them or perhaps write you right back directly you can email me
H Stanger at Binghamton dot edu oh and tomorrow 3:00 o’clock right here in this
building it’s going to be full 1200 people will be here to celebrate Stan
Whittingham and his winning of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry thank you very much you