13 MOST EXPENSIVE Universities In The World!

13 MOST EXPENSIVE Universities In The World!

October 15, 2019 0 By Stanley Isaacs


From a school that produces businessmen and
billionaires to an institution with an awe-inspiring library, today we look at the most expensive
universities in the world: 13. Oxford University Nobody knows for sure when Oxford University
was founded. But, there has been teaching there from at
least 1096, despite the fact that a precise date isn’t known. When English students came back from the University
of Paris in 1167, things started growing rapidly. In 1248, Oxford University was granted a royal
charter by King Henry III. Something interesting about Oxford is that
women weren’t allowed to take examinations there until 1875, and they didn’t get the
right to earn degrees as full-time students at the college until 1920. However, the total amount of women allowed
to attend Oxford was only a fourth of the number of men allowed to attend due to a quota
established in 1927. This wasn’t overthrown until 1957. Nowadays, the diversity of students at Oxford
is extensive. Their employees are as well; just recently,
Oxford University was named one of the top inclusive employers of those in the LGBT community. It is also one of the top ten schools in the
world; so, it shouldn’t be surprising that it’s also one of the most expensive. Annual tuition at Oxford University is approximately
44,950 USD or 34,678 pounds. 12. Duke University In 1838, Duke University was called Brown’s
Schoolhouse, which was founded in the area that is now the town of Trinity, North Carolina. Three years later, it was renamed the Union
Institute Academy after a charter was issued by the state. Ten years later, it became the Normal College. In 1859, it received the name “Trinity College”
due to its Methodist support. It didn’t become Duke University until the
1920s when Washington Duke’s son, James Buchanan Duke, distributed a significant amount
of money to the school via The Duke Endowment, which allowed its expansion. The Duke family was very wealthy because of
their tobacco empire. Nowadays, annual tuition is around $55,960,
and this university is one of the top ten in the world! 11. Bucknell University This liberal arts college is in Lewisburg,
Pennsylvania. It was established in 1846; but, it didn’t
get the name it has now until 1886 after a donation from William Bucknell saved the school
from collapsing. Today, the university encompasses over one
hundred buildings on four hundred fifty acres of land. Tuition for this college is a whopping $56,092,
and it is ranked as one of America’s top schools. 10. University of Southern California When this university opened in 1880, tuition
was just $15.00 a term. Students also weren’t permitted to leave
town unless the president knew and gave his consent. In 1884, the first graduating class consisted
of two men and a female valedictorian named Minnie C. Miltimore. Today, there are approximately forty-three
thousand students attending the college. In 2016, USC was made tenth place in the Niche
ranking of Best Colleges concerning quality of student life and academics. However, it’s a pretty penny to attend this
university at $56,225 per year. 9. Tufts University Tufts University came into being in 1852 after
it was chartered by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. It is located in Medford and Somerville. The land was originally owned by Charles Tuft
who said, “I will put a light on it,” when asked what he planned on doing with the
land. So, every year, all of the freshmen light
their own candles on the President’s Lawn during their first night there. Some notable people who graduated from Tufts
College are eBay founder Pierre Omidyar, Warner Bros. Television CEO Peter Roth, and Space Shuttle
Discovery commander Frederick Hauck. Attending this university costs students around
$56,382 every year. 8. Amherst College This college was developed from a secondary
school called Amherst Academy in 1821. Originally there were only forty-seven students. However, it grew rapidly, and in the mid-1830s,
it became the second largest school in the United States. Something interesting about Amherst is its
library; it is named after the famous American poet, Robert Frost, who worked at the college
as an English professor and Simpson lecturer for about forty years. Amherst College has come to be known as one
of the best regarding quality teaching because there is a significant amount of student-professor
interaction. Around ninety percent of the classes have
less than thirty students, and the ratio of students to faculty members is approximately
eight to one. Perhaps this is the reason Amherst was ranked
ten times as the number one liberal arts college in the United States out of two hundred sixty-six. It’s probably also the reason that tuition
is so expensive. The yearly fee to attend this school is $56,426. 7. Franklin and Marshall College Franklin College got its start in 1787 and
is located in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. It is on the site where an old brewery used
to sit. The university gets its name from Benjamin
Franklin, who, you should know, is one of the United States’ Founding Fathers. Plus, his inventions changed the world forever;
for instance, the lightning rod was, and is, quite significant. He donated £200 to the institution when it
was chartered. The other half of the school’s name comes
from John Marshall, who was the Chief Justice of the United States from 1801 to 1835. Marshall College was once its own entity as
well, but the two colleges merged in 1849. Franklin and Marshall College now has about
two thousand three hundred students enrolled and employs around one hundred seventy-five
full-time staff, giving it a decent teach-to-student ratio. However, attending this school isn’t cheap. One year costs about $56,550. 6. Landmark College This school is unique in that it is a private
college which solely accepts students who exhibit learning disabilities, such as dyslexia,
autism, and attention disorders. It was established in 1985 and is located
in Putney, Vermont. Landmark College is incredibly student-focused,
and everyone who attends receives personal assistance with their studies. The ratio of faculty to students is six to
one, and about ninety-seven percent of undergraduates live on campus. There are Associate degrees available in Gaming,
Sciences, and Business, and Bachelor degrees have been offered since 2012 in Art and Computing. However, the specialized services here are
quite costly, making its annual tuition expensive. Yearly attendance at Landmark College is approximately
$56,800. 5. Harvey Mudd College Established in 1955, this sought-after institution
is focused on degrees in science and engineering. It is in Claremont, California, and it’s
difficult to be accepted into. For the class of 2021, Harvey Mudd College
reportedly received four thousand seventy-eight applications but only admitted five hundred
thirty students, giving it a mere thirteen percent acceptance rate. However, Harvey Mudd has maintained the topmost
rate of Ph.D. production in science and engineering out of all other undergraduate colleges. There are several notable people who graduated
from this university, including two astronauts named Stan Love and George “Pinky” Nelson,
the Academy-Award-winner and Visual Effects Supervisor for Sony Pictures Imageworks, Scott
Stokdyk, and Dominic Mazzoni, who created the sound editing program called Audacity. But, earning a degree at this college comes
at the high price of about $56,876 per year. 4. Trinity College Trinity College is located in Hartford, Connecticut
and is one of eight prestigious liberal arts schools called the “Little Ivies.” It was founded in 1823 as Washington College
by Thomas Church Brownell and wasn’t renamed “Trinity” until 1845. Washington College’s original intention
was to be an alternative and protest to Yale. When it opened its doors for the first time
in 1824, there were only nine students attending classes there. Eventually, the college changed locations
from a fourteen-acre site to a one-hundred-acre site in 1878. By the time 1889 rolled around, the Trinity
College library had expanded as well, containing thirty thousand books. The student population grew as well to nine
hundred. Nowadays, Trinity has about two thousand three
hundred students, and its faculty-to-student ratio is about nine to one. A couple of notable alumni are the chairman
of MGM Resorts, Jim Murren, and George Will, a Pulitzer-Prize-winning author. Earning a degree from Trinity College cost
these guys a lot of money, and the school’s current tuition is about $56,910 annually. 3. Vassar College This private liberal arts college is in Poughkeepsie,
New York and was established in 1861 by Matthew Vassar. It was originally called Vassar Female College
and was founded as a women’s school. It exclusively accepted female students and
was one of the Seven Sisters colleges. It wasn’t until 1969 that Vassar became
coeducational. An interesting fact about this school is that
it had a secret society called Delta Sigma Rho, which was founded in 1922. Allegedly, Franklin Delano Roosevelt was a
trustee of this group before he became president of the United States. Today, Vassar College houses one of the most
impressive undergraduate libraries in the US, encompassing around one million volumes,
about seven thousand five hundred periodical, newspaper, and serial titles, and a significant
collection of microfilm. This school is very selective, with an acceptance
rate of under twenty-three percent, and it isn’t inexpensive either. One year at Vassar costs approximately $56,960. 2. University of Chicago This university was established in 1890 as
a coeducational school by the American Baptist Education Society. It received six hundred thousand dollars from
John D. Rockefeller, was an oil magnate and is the wealthiest person in modern history. The University of Chicago now encompasses
two hundred seventeen acres for its main campus. Its Mansueto Library alone has the means to
house three and a half million books; this library was even featured in the film Divergent
as the Erudite Branch. The University of Chicago is also one of the
top ten in the world, and it is known for producing billionaires. Some of the school’s alumni are Satya Nadella,
the CEO of Microsoft, Carl Sagan, a famous American astronomer, and Donald Johanson,
the anthropologist credited with discovering the australopithecine fossil called “Lucy.” However, before these people made money, they
had to spend a lot of money. A year at this university costs a whopping
$57,006. 1. Columbia University The first place spot on our list goes to Columbia
University. It is a private Ivy League school that was
established in 1754. It is New York’s oldest higher education
institution and the fifth-oldest in the entire country. Numerous notable people have graduated from
this university, including Baseball Hall-of-Famers Eddie Collins and Lou Gehrig, actors James
Franco and Jake Gyllenhaal, and Barack Obama, the forty-fourth United States president. But, it costs a lot of money to attend a school
like this, with one year at $59,430.