10 Different Types Of Music Teachers

10 Different Types Of Music Teachers

November 23, 2019 100 By Stanley Isaacs


*Music* I told you, it’s two beats. *demonstrates* What’s wrong with you? Just focus. *in tempo violin playing* *sigh* The phrase goes towards the end of the bar. Come on. I told you already five times. *violin playing* First note, check with the open D. *listening to tuning* It’s not in tune. Use your ears, do you have ears? *violin playing* Where’s your focus? *violin playing* What are you looking at? *violin playing* What is that? There’s nothing to do with Sibelius. *tsk* *violin playing* The note you just played just then… what does it mean? Um… It’s a G. Subdominant? Yeah. Well imagine Sibelius. The G could be an interpretation of his life, you know, when it’s cold and his pain but no one really knows what’s going on, you know music is like an internal thing but that’s all external influences. There’s no words to describe what Sibelius’ going through. And a lot of the time you have to just really understand what he wanted and… Whatever is written on the music can tell you everything you know… You have to push through discomfort and be comfortable with the uncomfortable. Got it? *knock knock* Teacher: Come in. *tuning violin* Teacher: Just warm up, I’ll be there with you soon. *violin playing* *violin playing* Sorry it took a while, the tea took a while to brew. Anyway, it sounded good. Do you want to start from the beginning again? *violin playing* Do you have anything else? *violin playing* Brilliant. Do you have anything else? Oh give me a second, let me just refill my tea. Go on, you can play. *out of tune violin playing* Good! that’s really really good! Um… Is there anything I can work on? Uh… No, not really, it’s fine, I mean just a bit more practicing to be perfectly fine, no worries. Take it easy, don’t work yourself too hard. I don’t know, I just feel…… Maybe I don’t sound… …that great. Stop looking so sad, just be happy. Be positive! Music is about sharing the love! *plays scales* When you start that note you just have to catch the bow! The starts from the fingers, you gotta *demonstrates* like *demonstrates* Everything has to have an articulation like *demonstrates* *articulated scales* No no, catch the bow! Like I said, catch! Catch! *articulated violin playing* What type of catch do you think this is? The “puh” or the “kuh”. It’s not a “poh”. No no no no, the movement is from the fingers. Catch, and release! Uh, by the way, how do you do good ricochet – You catch the bow! *ricochet playing* Do you have any exercises for vibrato? You catch the bow! *violin playing* No. Starting your first note is like a plane landing. You have to be a good pilot because if it’s bad land you can feel the bumps. Landing has be controlled and smooth, like… ..like this. *violin playing* Sometimes too much vibrato is like icing on the cake, this is too sweet. You don’t want to do too much. Cake is already sweet. Okay… Analogies. *plays note* Stop there. The first bounce is not even. *violin playing* The… The A is not really in tune with the D string. *tries again* Yeah yeah, the shoulders might need to drop a bit. Your nose can be a bit higher. *tries again* The string crossing was a bit excessive. *tries again* Feel the weight and this fourth finger, it creates the sound. You pull the string in. Push the string from there. *tries again* There was five oscillations in that vibrato. Should be six. *corrected violin playing* Okay, let’s move on to the third bar. *out of tune violin playing* I’m a singer and this school can’t find a violin teacher, but I think you should breathe. It’ll definitely help your intonation. *phone vibrates* Sorry one second. Hello? Yes, sorry darling. Can I call you later? Just because I’m teaching right now. No, no, I’m not teaching… I’m not… No not a singer, I’m teaching a violin student. Yeah, I don’t know, this… for my certificate diploma. They put me here to get experience teaching string instruments. That’s just how it works. Okay. Talk to you soon. Okay, so have you practiced your breathing for intonation? *violin playing* Kid, back in my days we used to warm up with three octave scales. And every time we need to play one hour of scales, two hours of studies, one hour of concerto, one hour of Bach, and two hours of chamber music, and three hours of orchestra. It’s all about twelve a days you know. Today you guys just have too many distractions. Your phone, what’s it called, social media? And uh, what’s the thing in social media? Uh, me-mes? You need to learn how to appreciate music, and look deeper into it. *violin playing* Stop. What’s the dynamic? Don’t look! *tsk* What is the marking? What is the expression marking here? Uh… Fortissimo… Andante? Here, let me write it down for you.