1.1.5. Academic Word List – Từ học thuật – Sublist 2

1.1.5. Academic Word List – Từ học thuật – Sublist 2

September 9, 2019 1 By Stanley Isaacs


Hello, let’s start today with sub-list 2
from the academic word list. Last time we finished sub-list 1 already.
In the sub-list 2, I also have words highlighted in green and in red. And again, words highlighted
in green are words you should look up on your own and words highlighted in red are the words
that I want to focus on today. Now, the words highlighted in green are:
affect, appropriate, conclude, construct, distinct, participate, purchase, range, relevant, and seek. They are all very important words, and many of them have very familiar meanings to you already,
so there’s no need for me to explain them. Let’s go to each of the words in red here. First, instead of saying, “get”, you should
now try to say all of these words: derive, or achieve, or acquire, or obtain. They are all academic words,
and they all mean “to get something”. For example, “derive”: you can derive
information from television, or you can derive knowledge from books. It means you get knowledge basically. You can also “achieve” something important or positive. Don’t use “achieve”
with something negative. For example, you can achieve great results.
Or you can also use “acquire”, as in “acquire knowledge”, or language acquisition. Or, you can also
acquire a language. Or, you can acquire a taste for wine or for chicken. Or if you are
a vampire, then you acquire a good taste for blood. And “obtain” also means to get
something, as in “obtain your test results”. So from now on, instead of using “get”, try
to use all of these words more. They all mean “to get something”. The next word is “assist” or “aid”,
instead of “help”. You can use “assist” or
“aid” somebody in doing something, or to aid somebody to do something. For example, you can say,
“Parents should assist children in studies”, instead of “Parents should help
children with studies”. Or “Classical music significantly aids sleep” meaning that it helps you to sleep better.
Here you have again two academic words — “significant” and “aid”. The next important words are “category” and “section”. You can use them in lieu of “type”, “sort”, or “kind”. For example, you can say, ”A community should
not be divided according to categories of class or race”, instead of “according
to sorts (or types) of”. The next important words: instead of
using “do”, from now on, you should start using the verbs: conduct, commit, or undertake. For example, you can conduct a research, you can conduct an experiment, you can commit
a crime, or you can commit an affair. Most of the time, “to commit something” is
to do something quite bad. So don’t use “commit” with a positive thing or action. You can also use the structure
“to be committed/devoted” to humanitarian causes, for example.
So “to be committed/devoted to something” means that you spend
a lot of time and energy on that thing. You can also “undertake” a job
or an assignment. So, all of these verbs mean “do”, but instead of using “do”, you can use these words more often now. The next word for us is “impact”, instead
of “effect” or “influence”. For example, you can say, “Early education has a significant
impact…”, instead of “a significant effect”, “…on a child’s later development.” “Impact” is an academic word
while “effect” and “influence” are not. The next word to use is probably the most common verb for you in an academic essay,
“to maintain”. Instead of saying “argue”, you can say “maintain”
from now on. It also means, “to argue”. For example, instead of saying, “I argue that children have rights”,
you can say, “I maintain that children have rights”. And “maintain” has other meanings
too, that you can check the dictionary. For example, “Teachers must maintain contact
with parents”. In this one, “maintain” just means “to keep”. So, try to use
“maintain” from now on whenever you write an academic essay because it also means, “to argue”. The next important word is “positive”.
From now on, use “good” less often. For example, if you want to say, “The outcomes
of the experiment were good”, no! Change it to, “The outcomes of
the experiment were positive”. Or we can have, “We all should have
a positive outlook on life”. The next two words that are important are
“previous” or “prior (to)”, instead of “before”. For example, you can say, “No previous experience is required for
this job”, or “No prior experience…” they mean the same. So, here you have two
academic words — “previous”/“prior” and “required”. Or you can also use
“Prior to the invention of the camera, people painted their loved ones to remember them.”
Here you have “prior to”. The next important words are, instead of “main”, use “primary” or “major” now.
Most of the time, you can delete the word “main” or “mainly”
from your academic essay. For example, instead of saying “the main reason”, you can say,
“the primary reason”, or “the major reason”, “…for his absence was that he lives far
from school.” Or, instead of saying
“there are mainly girls in the class”, you can say,
“the class consists primarily of girls”. Here you have two academic words,
“consist” and “primarily”. Very very very useful words for you. The next one is, instead of saying, “choose”, you say “select”. For example, for
“I choose my choice”, you can say, “I select my options”. So, here you have two academic
words again, “select” and “option”. These are all the important academic words
that I want you to learn in sub-list 2. Again, please remember that words from sub-list 1
and 2 are the most frequent words that you are likely to encounter when you write or
read academic papers. So, try to learn all of them if you can. If you cannot learn all
of them due to time restraints, you can try to learn all the words highlighted in red
and in green. So, next time we will start with sub-lists 3 and 4.